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Jeff Gordon set for 750th race

Aug 29, 2014; Hampton, GA, USA; NASCAR Sprint Cup Series driver Jeff Gordon during practice for the Oral-B USA 500 at Atlanta Motor Speedway. Mandatory Credit: Kevin Liles-USA TODAY Sports

Sunday’s Oral-B USA 500 NASCAR Sprint Cup Series race at Atlanta Motor Speedway will mark a milestone in Jeff Gordon’s racing career. It’ll be Gordon’s 750th start at the Cup level. It’s fitting that such a milestone come at AMS, as the track played host to then-Winston Cup start number one. That race was the last race of the 1992 Cup season. As the Gordon era of NASCAR racing was being ushered in, the Richard Petty era was coming to a close. Gordon’s first race at the Cup level was also Petty’s last as a driver.

Not only will Sunday’s race be Gordon’s 750th start, overall, at NASCAR’s top-level, it’ll also mark 750-consecutive starts for the driver, as he’s never missed a race since that first event at Atlanta nearly 22 years ago. As a frame of reference, the next highest consecutive-race streak among active drivers is that of Matt Kenseth at 526 races, according to NASCAR.com. The all-time record streak of consecutive start is held by Ricky Rudd at 788. With 11 races to go in 2014 after Sunday night’s race, Gordon is on course to break Rudd’s record in 2015.

Gordon was asked about the milestone on Friday. Here’s what he had to say:

TALK ABOUT YOUR 750 STARTS:

“That is a big number. I hadn’t thought about it a whole lot until I saw a decal with it made up. I thought ‘man that is a lot of races, especially in a row’. Really proud of that, it’s been an amazing career in the Cup Series. It seems like it was yesterday that it started right here over 20 years ago. I love this track. I love racing here so it’s pretty cool to have 750 happening here.”

WHAT DO YOU ATTRIBUTE YOUR LONGEVITY TO?

“My strong back (laughs). No I got very fortunate that I got a very young start as well as I got a chance to start with one of the best teams and team owners out there with Hendrick Motorsports and Rick Hendrick. It’s funny I did a thing this week with Kasey Kahne for Valvoline and we were talking about our start and how we got to the Cup Series and our path there. So we were reminiscing a little bit about some key moments that got us here. While he didn’t start as young as I did when he did start it was a pretty quick path. For me, when I moved to Indiana and started racing sprint cars and midgets and things like that it’s amazing how quick things happened. It seemed like one year I was graduating from high school and a year later I was going to drive a Nationwide car. A year later I was getting offers to go Cup racing and then two years later I was in the Cup Series. Two years after that I was winning my first Cup championship. All I can contribute it to is just a lot of good things happening at the right moments, meeting the right people and getting here at a young age. Then good genes too. I’ve taken so big hits. Some that could have taken me out of contention to stop that streak. Yet, either the schedule worked out or my body healed itself or whatever happened. Here we are at 750. At the time I didn’t really think about that, but now I look back on it and it’s something I’m proud of.”

Here’s a graphic (courtesy of NASCAR) that lists some of Gordon’s milestones, including Altanta Motor Speedway milestones:

Follow Stock Car Spin on Twitter @SCSblog or like Stock Car Spin on Facebook. Amanda’s also on Twitter @NASCARexaminer and has a fan/like page on Facebook: NASCAR Examiner

Tags: Atlanta Motor Speedway Jeff Gordon NASCAR

Article source: http://stockcarspin.com/2014/08/31/jeff-gordon-set-750th-race/

2014 Hyundai Equus — a Korean entry in the German-dominated luxury car field.


The 2014 Hyundai Equus, a luxury car from Korea. (All photos by Michael Taylor)


The Equus comes in two flavors -- Signature and the more expensive Ultimate. The Signature is $61,250; the Ultimate, $68,920.


The Equus is Hyundai's most expensive car; next down the line is the Genesis, newly revamped.


For 2014, the car got a mild facelift  they tweaked the grille and the front bumper, added LED foglights, and played with the taillights a bit. The 19-inch wheels are now thin-spoked aluminum.


Rear seat passengers get the full-boat comfort treatment.


Entertainment/navigation screen for rear seat occupants.


The two-zone HVAC is now three zone (the two front areas and the rear.) Ive  always felt this divvying up of temperature zones was a bit of a marketing gimmick; its a small cabin, guys, and there isnt much room to make distinctively different climates in there.


Buttons on the left side of the front passenger seat seatback allow for adjustments so the driver doesn't have to get out of the car, come around to the right side and do it with the adjusters the passenger would normally use.


Rear seat HVAC vents and information panel.


Rear seat passengers get their own control panel, in the form of a center arm rest.


The rear-wheel-drive Equus is Hyundais top of the line. It sports a 5-liter V8 engine that puts out (and this is a curious stat) 429 horses when fueled with premium and 421 horsepower when its drinking regular. All this is driven through an eight-speed automatic that has the requisite manumatic option that lets you saw through the gears.


The Ultimate package: lane departure warning, blind spot monitor, rear cross-traffic alert (it beeps when a car is crossing your stern), power sunshades in the rear, head-up display (speedometer readings show up in the windshield, imitating a fighter jets display), smart cruise control (it will bring the car to a dead stop, if necessary) and a 17-speaker stereo that will blow you out of your leather seats. When your car needs servicing, Hyundai will send someone to pick it up (at home or office) and leave you with a loaner.


Front seat adjustment buttons are mounted on the door.

The question is not whether this is a fine, well-appointed luxury car – you’ll make your own decision once you’ve had a look at the 2014 Hyundai Equus. The question is whether this car will ever penetrate the tight circle of luxo barges that already appear to have a lock on the market – Audi’s A8, BMW’s 7-series and the S-class Mercedes-Benz. Much of this market is driven by perception, snobbery, keeping up with the Joneses and, of course, an appreciation of fine machinery.

But the underlying theme is image, or a lack of it. What this means can be seen in the face of anyone I meet who asks what I’m driving – sometimes, they look over my shoulder to see if they can identify the big white whale behind me (the Equus). When I say, “it’s a Hyundai,” they may say, “a Honda?” or they may say, “Hyundai?” or they may just look vague. Again, it’s perception – for many people, what you drive is who you are.

So the best advice may be: get over it. If you want a big luxury car, with all the safety gizmos and the luxury appointments and the hushed cabin at 70 miles an  hour, you owe it to yourself to try all of them – the German Three, plus Jaguar, Cadillac, Maserati, Lexus, Infiniti and Hyundai. This is probably a losing battle – the die is cast when it comes to high-end cars, and people will continue to follow the herd into those Audi, Benz and BMW showrooms.

Since this review is about the 2014 Hyundai Equus, sit still for a few minutes and eat your Hyundai oatmeal. It’s not gonna hurt.

What we have here is a nearly two-and-a-half ton four-door sedan that has plenty of room in front and plenty of room in back. The rear seat passengers in this Ultimate edition (there is also the less costly Signature edition) are treated almost as well as their peers in front – dual rear screens for watching the navigation do its dance or watching movies; the rear center console through which you can control almost every function of the car, save driving it; the chilled seats.

The rear-wheel-drive Equus is Hyundai’s top of the line. It sports a 5-liter V8 engine that puts out (and this is a curious stat) 429 horses when fueled with premium and 421 horsepower when it’s drinking regular. All this is driven through an eight-speed automatic that has the requisite manumatic option that lets you saw through the gears. For 2014, the car got a mild facelift – they tweaked the grille and the front bumper, added LED foglights, and played with the taillights a bit. The 19-inch wheels are now thin-spoked aluminum and the two-zone HVAC is now three zone (the two front areas and the rear.) I’ve  always felt this divvying up of temperature zones was a bit of a marketing gimmick; it’s a small cabin, guys, and there isn’t much room to make distinctively different climates in there.

Being a super car means there are all the high-end electronic driving aids to help you down the turnpike. The Equus is nothing if not replete with these, most of them standard, some of them added with the Ultimate package: lane departure warning, blind spot monitor, rear cross-traffic alert (it beeps when a car is crossing your stern), power sunshades in the rear, head-up display (speedometer readings show up in the windshield, imitating a fighter jet’s display), smart cruise control (it will bring the car to a dead stop, if necessary) and a 17-speaker stereo that will blow you out of your leather seats. When your car needs servicing, Hyundai will send someone to pick it up (at home or office) and leave you with a loaner.

On the road, all this becomes a small symphony of svelte motoring. It’s not much different from all its competitors: the Equus is quiet, supple and, frankly, feels a bit heavy. When you compare their sizes, the three Germans are all within three inches of the Equus’s 203-inch length. When it comes to pricing, however, they are leagues apart.

The Audi A8, Mercedes-Benz S550 and BMW 7-series can range from the low seventy thousands into well over $100,000 and, in some cases, $150,000. The Equus Ultimate (the fancier of the two Equus models) is $68,920. That’s it.

In the future, of course, Hyundai may well raise the price of the Equus, but for now they have to get those customers in the door and have them pull out a checkbook and start writing, rather than just walking around the car and then heading for the (name the well-known brand) dealer next door.

Luxury car sales for 2013 compiled by goodcarbadcar.net show that Mercedes sold 13,303 S-class cars; BMW retailed 10,932 of the 7-series; Audi did 6,300 of the A8; and Hyundai sold 3,578 Equuses.

Maybe it’s the name. If they found a new name for their upscale cars, as Toyota did with Lexus and Nissan with Infiniti, things might change.

For now, however, what’s nice is the fact that you can go out there and buy a car that in many respects is the equal (Equus equal?) of the German troika but you don’t have to pay those prices.

There are worse deals in the auto marketplace.

For more consumer information on cars, check these Web sites:

Safety data can be found at the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS)  and the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA).

Reliability information can be seen in the  dependability studies conducted by J.D. Power; and at Consumer Reports.

Fuel mileage figures are available at this site, maintained by the U.S. Department of Energy.

For trivia lovers: the sticker you see on the window of every new car for sale in the United States is known in the auto industry as the “Monroney.” It is named for U.S. Senator Almer Stilwell (Mike) Monroney, the Oklahoma Democrat who sponsored the Automobile Information Disclosure Act of 1958, which required all new cars to have labels that detail the price of the car and its options.

 

Article source: http://blog.seattlepi.com/carsandtrucks/2014/08/25/2014-hyundai-equus-a-korean-entry-in-the-german-dominated-luxury-car-field/

Tony Stewart makes public statement

Aug 29, 2014; Hampton, GA, USA; NASCAR Sprint Cup Series driver Tony Stewart during a press conference at Atlanta Motor Speedway. Mandatory Credit: Kevin Liles-USA TODAY Sports

Tony Stewart is returning to NASCAR Sprint Cup Series racing this weekend at Atlanta Motor Speedway for Sunday’s Oral-B USA 500. On Friday, he spoke publicly for the first time since the Aug. 9 incident at Canandaigua (N.Y.) Motorsports Park that claimed the life of sprint car driver Kevin Ward Jr. Stewart didn’t take questions but made the following statement:

“This has been one of the toughest tragedies I’ve ever had to deal with both professionally and personally.  This is something that will definitely affect my life forever.  This is a sadness and a pain that I hope no one ever has to experience in their life.

“With that being said, I know that the pain and the mourning that Kevin Ward’s family and friends are experiencing is something that I can’t possibly imagine.

“I want Kevin’s father, Kevin Sr., and his mother Pam, and his sisters Christi, Kayla, Katelyn, to know that every day I’m thinking about them and praying for them.

 “The racing community is a large family, as you guys know.  Everyone’s saddened with this tragedy.

 “I want to thank all my friends and family for their support through this tough emotional time, and the support from the NASCAR community, my partners, all of our employees, it’s been overwhelming.

 “I’ve taken the last couple weeks off out of respect for Kevin and his family, and also to cope with the accident in my own way.  It’s given me the time to think about life and how easy it is to take it for granted.

 “I miss my team, my teammates.  I miss being back in the racecar.  I think being back in the car this week with my racing family will help me get through this difficult time.

 “I also understand that all of you have many questions and want a lot of answers, however I need to respect the ongoing investigation process and cannot answer and address the questions at this time.  Emotionally I’m not sure if I could answer them anyway.

 “We’re here to race this weekend, and I appreciate your respect.  There will be a day when I can sit here and answer the questions.  Thank you.”

While Stewart didn’t answer questions, Stewart-Haas Racing Executive Vice President Brett Frood did. Here’s a transcript from the press conference:

Q.  Brett, NASCAR issued a statement yesterday that Tony had received all necessary clearances to race.  What was the process of going through clearances?  What approvals did he need?


BRETT FROOD
:  Well, as you all know, when a driver’s out of the car, there is that process.  I’m not going to get into the medical side of it, but I will say we’ve been in close contact with them throughout the process, have gotten from them what he needed to get back in the car right now.
Q.  The investigation as we understand is still open.  Was there any thought to not having Tony race until it was closed?  Why now?


BRETT FROOD
:  Well, I think for Tony, it’s all about this healing process.  That’s part of why he’s in the car.

 

Besides his mom, his dad, his sister, his niece and nephew, his family is here, it’s at this racetrack.  It’s part of the healing process of being with his family that he’s been with since 1999, knowing that these people are going to help him get through this.  I think that’s one side of it.

 

The other side of it is he’s a racer.  We have 270 employees.  I think him putting a helmet on will help him cope with this situation.
Q.  Brett, respecting the process, the investigation, knowing there’s things you can’t comment on, are you able to say whether you know whether Tony has a clear picture in his own mind of what happened that second or two that night?


BRETT FROOD
:  I am not going to comment on the incident itself.  It was a tragic accident.  Right now the focus is to be on Tony and the car this weekend and how he’s going to get through this.
Q.  The fact that Tony is racing this weekend, should we read anything into that about what you know about the investigation and where it’s at in the process?


BRETT FROOD
:  No.  I mean, we’ve really been respecting the process, as Tony said, and the investigation.  Him being in the racecar right now is about him getting through what has been a very emotional two weeks, what his next step is in coping with this.

 

There’s been a great deal of empathy and sympathy for that family and what they’re going through.  For Tony, it’s just been extremely emotional.  This is what is going to help him.
Q.  Can you talk about where Tony is at emotionally right now to step into the car?  Was it 100% his choice not to race the last couple of weeks, without the involvement of the sanctioning body that we will hear from next?


BRETT FROOD
:  I’ll address the latter first. Yes, the decision to be in the car is 100% Tony’s.
Q.  Please define his emotional stage at this point.  A very fragile Tony Stewart at this point.


BRETT FROOD
:  You just saw Tony.  It’s been a difficult two weeks.  But Tony is ready to be in the racecar.  He wouldn’t be here if he wasn’t.
Q.  Brett, you’ve worked for Tony for a long time.  You’ve seen him in ways we have not.  How would you characterize his preparation for this and what you think he’ll experience as he gets back in the car?


BRETT FROOD
:  I think it’s going to be very overwhelming being in that garage today.  He’s going to feel an awful lot of support.  As I just mentioned, this is his family.  It’s the crew members, it’s the officials, it’s the drivers.  It’s his family that he’s been with since 1999.  This is going to be part of that process for him.  I believe it’s going to be an overwhelming process, this weekend.

 

That being said, Tony Stewart is a racecar driver.  He’s been a racecar driver for the past 35 years.  When he puts that helmet on in practice, I’m quite convinced he’ll be ready to race the car, he’ll be able to separate the two.
Q.  Brett, this obviously is a tremendous tragedy.  Obviously in the sport of racing, these guys learn to deal with that part of the sport.  Why do you think this has hit Tony so hard?


BRETT FROOD
:  Because he was involved in an accident and a young man died.  I can’t imagine what he’s going through.  I can’t imagine what the kid’s parents are going through.

 

It’s something, as Tony said, that he hopes no one in this room or certainly anywhere will ever have to go through.  He was involved in a tragic accident.
Q.  I noticed Tony mentioned Kevin Ward’s family members by name.  Has he reached out to them personally at all?


BRETT FROOD
:  Tony has sent the family flowers and a card around the services.  Besides that he’s been very respectful of them and their time to grieve.

 

I do know that it will be very important, it’s important for Tony, to spend time with the family.  I do believe that will happen in the appropriate time.
Q.  Obviously it’s an emotional time.  Internally how do you deal with it as an organization, the prep work?  Let’s face it, it’s not an ordinary weekend that all of you are dealing with.


BRETT FROOD
:  We’ve got 270 employees back in Kannapolis working hard.  Tony has three other team members.  These are folks that are at Stewart‑Haas because they believe in the leadership, they believe in the ownership, believe in the folks that we have surrounding them, and we believe in them.

 

So for them, I think their focus has been undeterred over the last several weeks.  They’re obviously really excited to have Tony back in the car, that leader, the guy they believe in.  So I think the focus will be there this weekend from those guys.  We should be good.

Follow Stock Car Spin on Twitter @SCSblog or like Stock Car Spin on Facebook. Amanda’s also on Twitter @NASCARexaminer and has a fan/like page on Facebook: NASCAR Examiner

Article source: http://stockcarspin.com/2014/08/29/tony-stewart-makes-public-statement/

Tony Stewart returns

Tony Stewart is back on the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series scene. After missing three Cup races at Watkins Glen (N.Y.) International, Michigan International Speedway and Bristol (Ten.) Motor Speedway, Stewart is set to return to racing action at Atlanta Motor Speedway for Sunday night’s Oral-B USA 500, according to a release from Stewart-Haas Racing.

“Tony Stewart has received all necessary clearances required to return to all racing activities, and therefore is eligible to compete this weekend at Atlanta Motor Speedway,” NASCAR Executive Vice President and Chief Racing Development Officer Steve O’Donnell said in a press release from NASCAR. “NASCAR has remained in constant contact with his race team, and we will stay very close to this situation as Stewart returns to competition.”

Stewart was involved in a sprint car accident at Canandaigua Motorsports Park in upstate New York on Aug. 9 when his car struck Kevin Ward Jr. who had climbed out of his car and was on the track during a caution period. Ward died from the injuries he sustained. Stewart has since been in seclusion, canceling all racing-related activities.

Nationwide Series driver Regan Smith drove Stewart’s No. 14 Sprint Cup Series Chevrolet at Watkins Glen, and semi-retired driver Jeff Burton drove the car in the two most recent races at Michigan and Bristol.

Stewart returns to the Sprint Cup circuit 26th in the championship driver points standings with 21 starts to his fellow-competitors’ 24. He is winless, so far, on the season. According to NASCAR rules regarding Chase eligibility, Stewart will not be eligible for the Chase, even if he were to win Sunday night at Atlanta or next weekend at Richmond (Va.) International Raceway, unless NASCAR offers him some kind of exemption. Rules stipulate that drivers must attempt to qualify for all races. Stewart did qualify his car at Watkins Glen, but not at Atlanta or Bristol.

Stewart has not yet spoken publicly. He is expected to participate in a press conference at Atlanta Motor Speedway on Friday afternoon. NASCAR President Mike Helton will also participate in a press conference Friday afternoon.

Follow Stock Car Spin on Twitter @SCSblog or like Stock Car Spin on Facebook. Amanda’s also on Twitter @NASCARexaminer and has a fan/like page on Facebook: NASCAR Examiner

Tags: Atlanta Motor Speedway NASCAR Tony Stewart

Article source: http://stockcarspin.com/2014/08/29/tony-stewart-returns/

Oh Thank Hydraulic! Infiniti Q50S to Get G37-Derived Steering System for 2016

2014 Infiniti Q50S2014 Infiniti Q50S
If you, like us, have been disappointed in Infiniti’s aloof Q50 sedan as the ostensible replacement for the sporty G37—which, incidentally, Infiniti still sells as the “Q40″ for 2015—we have good news. The Q50S model is set to get considerably more sporty for 2016, thanks to a retro revision headed where the car needs it most: the steering rack.

You see, the Q50′s base steering setup is an electrically assisted unit. Although some manufacturers have coaxed decent feedback from these systems, making them nearly as talkative as the hydraulically assisted racks we’re always reminiscing about, Infiniti is still chasing that bogey. At least the Q50S’s EPS marks an improvement over Infiniti’s wonky Direct Active Steer (DAS) option, which offers zero road feel and lacks precision. Happily, Infiniti got enthusiasts’ message and is looking to the past to cure its current sins. Speaking with Infiniti’s head of product planning, Keith St. Clair, we’ve learned that the brand is working on ditching the Q50S’s base electric power steering in favor of a rack derived from the G sedan’s heavenly hydraulic-boosted setup.

“Some members of the enthusiast community, including the media, suggested the car could benefit with enhanced steering feel, as in more engagement similar to the former G Sedan Sport,” St. Clair said. He told us development engineers built a prototype from one of its pool cars, with the steering system of an old G, along with some tweaks to the exhaust system to bring the Q50′s sound closer to that of earlier Infinitis.

“The results were very clear and pronounced. The car is a blast to drive,” said St. Clair, who noted that his team subsequently presented the car to the powers that be in Japan. He added that Infiniti is “now looking into the fastest path for adopting these into regular production.”

The revised Q50S is likely to appear sometime in the 2016 model year, St. Clair said, and would be accompanied by amped-up styling and chassis upgrades. It isn’t clear what the proposed changes mean for the Q50S Hybrid or for regular, non-S Q50 models, but needless to say, we can’t wait.



2014 Infiniti Q50S2014 Infiniti Q50S

Article source: http://blog.caranddriver.com/oh-thank-hydraulic-infiniti-q50s-to-get-g37-derived-steering-system-for-2016/

Car crashes into historic Columbia City building


The Carol Cobb Hair Salon and The Grecian Delight building is shown after an SUV crashed into the historic Columbia City building. The crash injured 7 people. Photographed on Thursday, August 28, 2014. (Joshua Trujillo, seattlepi.com)


The Carol Cobb Hair Salon and The Grecian Delight building is shown after an SUV crashed into the historic Columbia City building. The crash injured 7 people. Photographed on Thursday, August 28, 2014. (Joshua Trujillo, seattlepi.com)


The Carol Cobb Hair Salon and The Grecian Delight building is shown after an SUV crashed into the historic Columbia City building. The crash injured 7 people. Photographed on Thursday, August 28, 2014. (Joshua Trujillo, seattlepi.com)


The Carol Cobb Hair Salon and The Grecian Delight building is shown after an SUV crashed into the historic Columbia City building. The crash injured 7 people. Photographed on Thursday, August 28, 2014. (Joshua Trujillo, seattlepi.com)


The Carol Cobb Hair Salon and The Grecian Delight building is shown after an SUV crashed into the historic Columbia City building. The crash injured 7 people. Photographed on Thursday, August 28, 2014. (Joshua Trujillo, seattlepi.com)


The Carol Cobb Hair Salon and The Grecian Delight building is shown after an SUV crashed into the historic Columbia City building. The crash injured 7 people. Photographed on Thursday, August 28, 2014. (Joshua Trujillo, seattlepi.com)


The Carol Cobb Hair Salon and The Grecian Delight building is shown after an SUV crashed into the historic Columbia City building. The crash injured 7 people. Photographed on Thursday, August 28, 2014. (Joshua Trujillo, seattlepi.com)


The Carol Cobb Hair Salon and The Grecian Delight building is shown after an SUV crashed into the historic Columbia City building. The crash injured 7 people. Photographed on Thursday, August 28, 2014. (Joshua Trujillo, seattlepi.com)


The Carol Cobb Hair Salon and The Grecian Delight building is shown after an SUV crashed into the historic Columbia City building. The crash injured 7 people. Photographed on Thursday, August 28, 2014. (Joshua Trujillo, seattlepi.com)


The Carol Cobb Hair Salon and The Grecian Delight building is shown after an SUV crashed into the historic Columbia City building. The crash injured 7 people. Photographed on Thursday, August 28, 2014. (Joshua Trujillo, seattlepi.com)


The Carol Cobb Hair Salon and The Grecian Delight building is shown after an SUV crashed into the historic Columbia City building. The crash injured 7 people. Photographed on Thursday, August 28, 2014. (Joshua Trujillo, seattlepi.com)

Seattle police and fire personnel are investigating a Columbia City scene where an SUV drove into a hair salon in a historic building, injuring seven people. The structural integrity of the historic building may be compromised after a concrete support pillar was demolished, said Seattle firefighters on the scene.

Rainier Avenue South and South Ferdinand Street were closed near the scene. Most lanes opened up again about 90 minutes after the crash. The closure affects traffic in the heart of the Columbia City neighborhood.

The incident occurred about 1:20 p.m. The hair salon, the Carol Cobb Salon, is neighbored by two restaurants in the same building —Grecian Delight and La Teranga. They were also damaged in the crash with the car largely coming to rest inside Grecian Delight.

The driver, a woman believed to be in her 40s, suffered minor injuries and was taken to Harborview Medical Center as a precautionary measure, Seattle Fire Department spokesman Kyle Moore said.

Three people in the Greek restaurant – a mother, a father and their 10-year-old daughter – were trapped by the SUV and extricated by crews. They, too, suffered minor injuries and some burns and were taken to Harborview.

Inside and near the salon, two women and a boy believed to be 6 to 8 years old were struck by the SUV. The boy and his mother suffered burns and were taken to Harborview, while the third person was hit by debris, but declined aid, Moore said.

The woman who declined aid said she works next door at Bikeworks and had just picked up lunch when the SUV went careening into the building. She heard screaming immediately after the crash.

Salon owner Carol Versey-Cobb, who has owned her corner business for 20 years, said she just finished a significant remodel of the building. The same thing happened to the building about 10 years ago when a car drove into the business, she said while surveying the damage. However, this time the damage was much more significant, she said.

Crews are assessing the structural integrity of the building; the crash caused two large cracks, reports say. Hydraulic bracing from the fire department is currently supporting the building, Moore said. Meanwhile, the building was turned over to the owner, who must bring in an independent engineer to examine the structure.

The SUV remains inside the building.

Authorities have not announced what caused the SUV to veer into the structure.

Article source: http://blog.seattlepi.com/seattle911/2014/08/28/car-crashes-into-columbia-city-hair-salon/

Checklist for Labor Day Car Shopping

Labor Day is a federally-recognized
holiday which celebrates hardworking Americans with a day off from work.
Unofficially, this day also marks the end of summer and is considered one of
the best times to buy a new car.

TrueCar.com estimated that Labor Day weekend last year would boast 1.13 million unit sales among the
country’s leading automotive manufacturers. With
the car-buying trend likely to pick up at a similar speed from the last Labor
Day weekend, it’s clear that now is the best time to buy a car for those in the
market. But like any other major purchase – particularly purchases that require
haggling – it’s important to know the obstacles you’ll face at the dealership.

Whether you’re goal is to drive off
your local dealership lot in a new car or you’re waiting for incentives at the
end of the year, it’s important do a bit of reconnaissance about your target
vehicle, and be armed with the right approach to secure the best deal.

Here are 10 must-dos before signing
on the dotted line: 

1. Know your budget.

Calculate your monthly or recurring
financial obligations before coming up with a price you’re willing to spend on
a car. Once you’ve determined how much your output is for bills and other regular
expenses such as groceries and personal care items, consider your income after
taxes. As a guide, a conservative range for a monthly car payment is within 10 to 15 percent of your available discretionary budget. A mistake that many rookie car buyers make
is filling up the remainder of their available money stores with a massive car
loan payment, without breathing room for essentials such as gas, annual
registration, car insurance and maintenance.

2. Check your credit report.

Purchasing a car involves a two-way
negotiation, particularly when you’re financing a car instead of buying it
outright. The reality is that loan lenders use your credit report and credit
score as a basis for determining whether to even approve you for a new line of
credit, what financing percentage of the vehicle purchase to offer, as well as
what interest rate to charge on the loan. All of these factors affect the
overall affordability of the car you’re eyeing.

Before the test drive, know where
your credit stands. Request a copy of your credit report to make sure there aren’t any errors
casting your financial reputation in a negative light. If your credit score
seems unusually low, and you’ve identified a mistake on your report, contact
the three credit bureaus immediately to correct the issue.

3. Test drive ahead of time.

Cast a wide net by feeling out a
variety of car models within your price point – before you decide you’re ready
to buy. The car you’ve dreamed about may not handle as well on the road as
you’d have hoped, and there may be features you were expecting that the
manufacturer doesn’t offer for that model. Test driving a car on the day you’re
expecting to buy can add undue pressure on you at the dealership and cause
anxiety because you’re unprepared.

4. Identify the trim level you want.

Besides locking in your
budget and deciding the make and model of the car you want, make sure you know the
features and upgrades you need, are indifferent about and simply do not want.
Make these granular details known to the sales associate you’re working with,
and be firm about what you want. This way there isn’t a question about whether
you’d be OK with paying more
for a moonroof and 18-inch wheels when you walked in wanting a base model at
$2,000 less.

5. Research average price points.

At this stage in the game you’ve
identified how much you realistically can afford and what you want in a car,
but what’s equally important is knowing what price points are available for the
car specifications you want. Using online tools like TrueCar.com can help
demystify how much of a deal you’re really getting.

Car-buying sites can reveal a wealth
of information about pricing, which you can use when negotiating a car purchase. When walking into a dealership, it’s
important to know the manufacturer’s suggested retail price (MSRP), the invoice
price (how much the dealer pays for the car) and the average amount paid in
your area.

6. Seek out manufacturer or dealer promotions.

High car-sale periods of the year,
like Labor Day weekend, are a good time to buy a new car because dealerships
are looking to push current year inventory out to make room on the lot for 2015
vehicle models. Some manufacturers also recognize these holidays are a good
opportunity to encourage more purchases, so keep a lookout for discounts or
rebates for 2014 stock
.

7. Get a preapproved auto loan.

Probably the most vital – and
effective – item on this checklist is securing preapproved financing from your
bank or credit union. Preapproval shows dealerships you’re serious about
purchasing a car now, so you can cut some of the back-and-forth haggling from
the get-go. Also, it keeps your budget defined, helping you avoid up-sells, and
likely keeps your auto loan rate as low as can be, as dealership-based loans
are often not highly competitive compared to local bank and credit union
interest rates.

8. Watch out for add-on features.

Despite all the measures you’ve
taken thus far to avoid getting charged more money out the door, it’s always
important to ask for an itemized cost list when discussing pricing. Sometimes
tricky financing managers try to sneak in extras like an extended warranty that
increases your price overall.

9. Beware of negotiating with four-squares.

If for whatever reason you found
your way to a dealership without getting preapproved and you’re, in fact,
interested in financing through the dealership, make sure you stay mindful of
the overall picture. Often car buyers will be shown a four-square worksheet that is used to distract them from how the numbers are
being shifted around. The squares are used to identify any trade-in credit,
vehicle price, down payment and monthly payment. 

Throughout the negotiations, you’ll
notice the notes in the squares become a lot more cluttered, disorganized and
confusing. The goal of this tactic is to make you think the dealership is
actually working with any pricing hesitations you may have and to get you to
focus solely on the monthly payment instead of out-the-door pricing.

10. Take the pressure off.

At the end of the day, you have more
leverage over the car-buying experience than you realize. Even if you spend
three hours trying to get to your ideal price point, you can still walk away
and give yourself the week to think about the purchase if you’re feeling
pressured. 

Article source: http://money.usnews.com/money/blogs/my-money/2014/08/28/10-step-checklist-for-labor-day-car-shopping

BLOG: Car dealers miss tire education opportunities

DETROIT (Aug. 28, 2014) — As a teen, I didn’t know how to change a tire. Neither did my girlfriends.

In fact, I don’t know how to change a tire now. My plan is to call roadside assistance if I ever have a problem.

But that could be a long wait and, depending on the neighborhood, a scary one. So I should learn. And this is where savvy car dealers have an opportunity to do community outreach and get consumers in their doors for new or repeat business.

A recent survey, as reported in The Wall Street Journal, says 52 percent of American teens ages 15 to 17 do not know how to change a tire. It also says 44 percent don’t know how to check tire tread depth, and 32 percent do not know how to check tire pressure.

The study, paid for by Michelin North America Inc. and the Federation Internationale de l’Automobile (FIA), surveyed 1,001 teens in late June.

If the study is accurate, the need for education in car maintenance is clear.

I believe a lot of people take basic car care for granted given the technology upgrades that now allow for such conveniences as run-flat tires and computer warning systems to alert you to problems.

I have written about auto dealerships that offer service clinics to customers. They teach some of the service basics, educate consumers on how an engine works and introduce them to local service technicians. Some clinics also teach customers how to use the technology on their cars.

But I don’t know of any car dealership that offers a car maintenance clinic to teach youths, or anyone else, the hands-on basics of car care: how to check the oil level, check tire pressure and troubleshoot vehicle problems that might arise on the road.

Such a clinic would be a community service and build customer loyalty and satisfaction. It also would allow some of us a chance, finally, to learn how to change a tire.

Jamie LaReau covers the automotive retail beat for Automotive News, a Detroit-based sister publication of Tire Business. This piece appeared on its website. Ms. LaReau can be reached at jlareau@crain.com.

Article source: http://www.tirebusiness.com/article/20140828/NEWS/140829928/blog-car-dealers-miss-tire-education-opportunities

LIVE TRAFFIC BLOG: Multi-car crash on Outer Loop

Sky 9 flew over this scene where an accident has traffic stopped on I-495 on Thursday morning.

Article source: http://www.wusa9.com/story/traffic/2014/08/28/traffic-accident-crash-outer-loop-dc-md-va/14724971/

Suspect arrested, jailed in West Seattle theft of SUV with baby inside

Update: Suspect arrested, jailed in West Seattle theft of SUV with baby inside

August 27, 2014 at 3:25 pm | In Crime, West Seattle news | 52 Comments

3:25 PM: Just tweeted by Seattle Police: “Officers searching for black SUV near 16SW/SW Holden after suspect steals car w/ 10-month-old child inside.” Suspect/vehicle description from SPD: “Hispanic male, 20s, 5’7, very short hair driving black Ford Edge w/ 22″ rims.” Please call 911 if you think you’ve seen it or know anything about it.

3:34 PM UPDATE: Baby and vehicle have been found in White Center. Police are now trying to find the thief.

3:42 PM UPDATE: If you are in south West Seattle or White Center, you’re probably noticing at least one helicopter – this is what it’s related to – TV chopper for now, law-enforcement chopper Guardian One expected too. One of the choppers belongs to Channel 7, which tweeted an aerial view of the recovered SUV:

4:03 PM: According to radio discussion, police do know who they are looking for. Meantime, commenter Rachel reports what happened when the SUV turned up in White Center’s Greenbridge neighborhood:

I was in Dubsea Coffee when this was occurring. I noticed the black Edge parked in the middle of the road. People were honking at it as they tried to drive down the road. I thought it was bizarre that someone would park right in the middle of the street, but went back to working. About 10 minutes later, I decided to leave Dubsea and that’s when I saw a few people trying to look into the car. Someone realized that there was a baby in the car and opened the front door. That’s when the car started rolling backwards and everyone was scrambling to get out of the way. Finally, a woman jumped in and put the emergency brake on. A few seconds later, the police showed up and got a description of the perpetrator. A few minutes after that, another patrol car showed up with the father of the baby. It was so incredibly heartbreaking to watch him grab his baby out of the car. I am so very glad that there were people around who noticed the baby on this hot day. The people who called 911 and acted quickly to report this should absolutely be commended.

4:19 PM UPDATE: SPD reports a suspect is in custody.

9:31 PM UPDATE: As noted in comments, TV reports included surveillance video of the theft – here’s one version of the clip. The man who was arrested was booked into King County Jail just after 7 pm and is being held for investigation of kidnapping and vehicle theft; three domestic-violence cases are listed in his entry on the jail register – one listed as violation of a no-contact order. and the other two as fourth-degree assault. We’re checking if he has a record beyond that.

9:54 PM UPDATE: The suspect, who turns 25 years old tomorrow, has a home less than a block away from today’s incident, according to court documents from the June case involving the no-contact-order violation. The case involved an incident in June at the home of the suspect’s girlfriend, in the Puget Ridge area – he allegedly took her car without permission, and, according to the documents, almost left with the girlfriend’s 7-year-old daughter in the car. The girlfriend tried to stop him from driving it away; the court documents say, he used a Taser-type device to hurt her. Her daughter got out of the car before he left with it; he later abandoned it, the court papers say, after crashing it into a utility pole.

52 Comments
»

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  1. Holy Crap

    Comment by alki Resident — 3:32 pm August 27, 2014 #

  2. I guess that explains the helicopter right over head! I live right off of 16th Holden.

    Comment by AmyB — 3:37 pm August 27, 2014 #

  3. Why was the baby left in the car?

    Comment by West Seattle Mom — 3:37 pm August 27, 2014 #

  4. I’m glad the baby was found safe!!

    Comment by Westgirl — 3:39 pm August 27, 2014 #

  5. WSMom, no idea about the circumstances. Nor whether the thief was known or unknown to the car’s owner. Right now they’re focused on trying to find him.

    Comment by WSB — 3:41 pm August 27, 2014 #

  6. Yikes! Weapon involved? . I’m on 15th and Barton and the helicopter is overhead. Maybe I’ll lock the doors.

    Comment by Michele R. — 3:43 pm August 27, 2014 #

  7. Live on 13th and Caimbridge and have 2 news copters overhead and plenty of sirens coming from Roxbury. Hope they find this POS!!!

    Comment by J — 3:49 pm August 27, 2014 #

  8. This makes my stomach churn. I have a nine-month-old. This is exactly why if I have to run back into the house for something I forgot after I’ve already put her in the car – even if it’s only for 30 seconds – I ALWYS lock the car door.

    So glad the child was found safe!

    Comment by Amie — 3:58 pm August 27, 2014 #

  9. Just in case I needed another really solid reason never to leave my kids in a car. So scary! Very glad the child was rescued!

    Comment by ConcernedMama — 3:59 pm August 27, 2014 #

  10. They are still circling white center at 16th ave s and sw 104th 3 coppers guess they have not found guy.

    Comment by h — 4:00 pm August 27, 2014 #

  11. Just drove right by the park near there and SPD and King County officers were running around with tactical rifles and shotguns and more police vehicles on the way. I got out of there quick.

    Comment by Bradley — 4:00 pm August 27, 2014 #

  12. I was in Dubsea Coffee when this was occurring. I noticed the black Edge parked in the middle of the road. People were honking at it as they tried to drive down the road. I thought it was bizarre that someone would park right in the middle of the street, but went back to working. About 10 minutes later, I decided to leave Dubsea and that’s when I saw a few people trying to look into the car. Someone realized that there was a baby in the car and opened the front door. That’s when the car started rolling backwards and everyone was scrambling to get out of the way. Finally, a woman jumped in and put the emergency brake on. A few seconds later, the police showed up and got a description of the perpetrator. A few minutes after that, another patrol car showed up with the father of the baby. It was so incredibly heartbreaking to watch him grab his baby out of the car. I am so very glad that there were people around who noticed the baby on this hot day. The people who called 911 and acted quickly to report this should absolutely be commended.

    Comment by Rachel — 4:03 pm August 27, 2014 #

  13. wow – glad baby is safe, no matter the reason he/she was left alone!

    Comment by BMC — 4:03 pm August 27, 2014 #

  14. Whenever I see a story like this one, I am so thankful to live in a neighborhood where people intervene in a crisis. So glad the baby is safe!

    Comment by Whew! — 4:07 pm August 27, 2014 #

  15. It’s still a very active search. As just added to the story, police believe they know who they are looking for. Also please note before assuming the baby was left inside the car alone – we don’t know if that was the circumstance, or if it was more of a carjacking or what.

    Comment by WSB — 4:08 pm August 27, 2014 #

  16. He probably hopped at bus by now.

    Comment by alki Resident — 4:15 pm August 27, 2014 #

  17. My heart breaks hearing how the father embraced his baby when he got to him. Gave me chills.

    Comment by alki Resident — 4:26 pm August 27, 2014 #

  18. If you didn’t see the update, suspect’s in custody. Less than an hour after the baby and SUV were found in Greenbridge. – TR

    Comment by WSB — 4:29 pm August 27, 2014 #

  19. There is a blue and white helicopter hovering. With binoculars I can’t make out if it is Komo or sheriffs.

    Comment by tim — 4:29 pm August 27, 2014 #

  20. Guardian One has been involved, as was at least one TV chopper. Since it’s news time you’ll likely see helicopter(s) for a while even though the suspect is in custody, baby is safe, etc. – TR

    Comment by WSB — 4:31 pm August 27, 2014 #

  21. So happy this has turned out well. For those of you already condemning the parents, just STOP IT! Even if the baby was left in the car this does not give anyone the right to steal the car!!!! These people are the victims, not the criminals.

    Comment by Lolapop — 4:32 pm August 27, 2014 #

  22. That was pretty cool watching it all on the Channel 7 streaming from the chopper. Caught the guy at 17th and Roxbury in the Mexican restaurant on the corner.

    Comment by JB — 4:33 pm August 27, 2014 #

  23. They pulled the suspect from the Mexican Restaurant on 17th and Roxbury. Glad to see they caught this POS and the child is safe

    Comment by J — 4:34 pm August 27, 2014 #

  24. Having been monitoring the scanner as the wide-ranging search unfolded, it sounded like officers were getting lots of tips, so kudos to everyone helping. – TR

    Comment by WSB — 4:36 pm August 27, 2014 #

  25. Why do people ask questions of us readers such as; “Why was the baby left in the car?” Now…approximately 30 min after capture/arrest… much more police activity in W.C. again.

    Comment by Markb — 4:40 pm August 27, 2014 #

  26. 4:46 pm, another helicopter hovering at about 16th SW/SW Roxbury….

    Comment by sally — 4:46 pm August 27, 2014 #

  27. I can’t say enough about Seattle and King County police who came together and found this guy within and hour. This is an amazing event and hopefully a lesson to all of us parents and grandparents who need to think twice about leaving our kids unattended for a second. This could’ve easily happened to any one of us. This father will never look at his baby the same way.
    This guy who stole the suv ,WILL be out of jail eventually and back at it stealing cars. Please be safe out there.
    In times like this,Thank God for our blog so we all can watch for these type of situations and help locate people.

    Comment by alki Resident — 4:50 pm August 27, 2014 #

  28. I was at 16th and Holden light when what had to have been the father was running frantically to the fire station across the street. He was on the phone, but the look in his eyes and expression was one I won’t forget–sheer terror. Sooo glad the baby is ok!

    Comment by Ldr — 4:55 pm August 27, 2014 #

  29. Yes….Helicopters are BACK OVER WHITE CENTER AGAIN.!!! Perhaps wrong suspect?

    Comment by Markb — 4:59 pm August 27, 2014 #

  30. I was there when this happened and the person was parked right in front of a store in front of a huge amount of people and all of a sudden this man runs from out of nowhere and jumps in car. The owner was holding his keys and standing there in shock and screaming at the guy when he started taking off. I was so surprised on the quick response of the police. The owner of the store has video and was going to watch and see if he had anything to help with crime. Alot of people were at the bus stop and in the parking lot which holds a espresso stand and food joint, lot’s of witnesses and I am glad they found this man

    Comment by christine drake — 5:01 pm August 27, 2014 #

  31. The suspect was reported to have been positively ID’d by victim and/or witnesses. Obviously that doesn’t equal a conviction – he has yet to have his day in court. As for the helicopters – unless something new has broken out that we haven’t heard of yet, keep in mind, it’s 5 pm TV news time.

    Comment by WSB — 5:04 pm August 27, 2014 #

  32. This is also why I have all doors locked at all times while driving.

    If the car owner had his keys in his hand, how was the suspect able to drive off?

    Comment by Amie — 5:10 pm August 27, 2014 #

  33. Wow, so glad the baby is alright, so scary to think about that.

    Comment by Jason — 5:49 pm August 27, 2014 #

  34. There was something else, I am guessing, going on around the same time (4:15ish). I drove by a house near 17th and 107th and there were multiple police/sheriff vehicles plus a fire engine outside a home on 107th. Shortly after turning south onto Ambaum, I had to pull over for an ambulance headed in that direction.

    Comment by Graham Morgan — 5:54 pm August 27, 2014 #

  35. … minor point, but in my last post, I should have noted I turned south on 16th, not Ambaum.

    Comment by Graham Morgan — 6:21 pm August 27, 2014 #

  36. Amie…keyless start? It’s a new car. And, yes, why do people always blame the victim? He may have strapped his child in the back seat, walking around to his side, and suspect takes car? Think about it…and don’t blame before you have the whole story. Geez.

    Comment by JanS — 6:37 pm August 27, 2014 #

  37. JanS – I wasn’t blaming anyone. I was asking a simple question. Chill out.

    Comment by Amie — 7:33 pm August 27, 2014 #

  38. This could have very easily happened without some derelict parent screwing up again. I JUST today, pulled my car around my alley, pulled up right in front of my garage to load the baby stroller into my car. The drivers door was left ajar and while I was inches from my car (baby strapped in car seat) if some scumbag with a weapon approached me (and I didn’t kill him first) could have easily joked in my car, with my child. The other scenario would be, dad gets out of car- walks around the other side to get baby out and someone jumps in during that walk around. People need to stop always blaming parents for everything that goes wrong. It’s a hard enough job and even those who strive for perfection will never provide the perfect and safe upbringing for their kids. Give us all a break and show some compassion that this poor baby has his daddy back.

    Comment by Wsrez — 8:50 pm August 27, 2014 #

  39. I saw the video on the news and it happened very quickly and the dad was just steps away from the car. The thief acted almost as soon as the dad got out of the car. It could’ve literally been as fast as the dad walking around to his side as JanS said. I can see the same thing happening to me at some point when my kids were little. How terrifying for the dad and thank goodness the baby was recovered swiftly and unharmed! Also very glad they caught the creep who did this. I assume kidnapping will be a much more severe punishment than car theft so hopefully he will actually be locked up for a while.

    Comment by kayo — 9:11 pm August 27, 2014 #

  40. Very glad this ended the way it did and this baby is home safely. Such an incredible, quick response from so many people in West Seattle and White Center. Thank you, neighbors!

    Comment by m — 9:17 pm August 27, 2014 #

  41. The story is updated with information we just found about the suspect’s criminal history; he was booked into jail a few hours ago and likely will have a bail hearing tomorrow.

    Comment by WSB — 10:00 pm August 27, 2014 #

  42. Go easy on those asking about the circumstances. When faced with random acts of violence, it’s normal for people to try to find something that would distance them from the victims. It’s fear. And empathy. If a person can grasp on to some fact that separates them from the crime and the victim, it makes that person feel safer. It’s not being mean or judgmental, it’s fear. It helps people sleep at night to think that something like this couldn’t happen to them. Of course they’re wrong. Random acts of violence happen. But fear is powerful.

    Comment by D — 10:44 pm August 27, 2014 #

  43. I drove my in-laws new Ford Taurus ALL THE WAY HOME FROM THE AIRPORT without the keys because it has the fancy push start thing and we never turned the car off when dropping them off. Luckily I realized it before I turned the car off! He could have been standing within a few feet of the car with the keys when this guy jumped in and could have pressed the on button. Very, very scary!

    Comment by AJP — 12:04 am August 28, 2014 #

  44. Is this going to be the incident that finally breaks the camels back? When is this neighborhood going to stop being neglected in the crime fighting dept. Every day SOMETHING happens around here.The attitude seems to be ” Oh well its down there in Westwood/ White Center,they don’t matter as much as OTHER sections of West Seattle”.What type of heinous crime is it going to take before something is done about this. A crime a day keeps gentrification away, maybe thats the attitude that will change perspectives.

    Comment by sophista-tiki — 7:16 am August 28, 2014 #

  45. Just yesterday I left my kids inside my car with keys in the ignition while I walked back to my house to retrieve the mail. This could happen to me. I will be more careful

    Comment by Guilty — 7:21 am August 28, 2014 #

  46. If the father had been armed, would it have been legal to shoot the thief? The justification being that he was stealing a child, the counter argument being that the thief didn’t know the child was in the vehicle. Does it matter what the thief knew or didn’t know about the extent of damage he was doing during the act of committing a crime? I am not implying that a weapon would have made a better outcome,or a worse outcome with the possibility of innocent people getting shot,the question isn’t about guns just the legality of the scenario.

    Comment by thistle stairs — 7:55 am August 28, 2014 #

  47. My heart aches picturing the man embracing his baby after such a horrific ordeal. Absolutely terrifying. I will pray for them. It’s going to take a long time to emotionally recover from such trauma. God bless.

    Comment by lox — 8:25 am August 28, 2014 #

  48. This seems like a good time to remind folks about how vulnerable we can be while we pump gas – I am guilty of leaving my keys, purse phone while I pump gas into my (unlocked) car. Bad idea this is why.
    I appreciate the last comment too – my kids are older now but in sure I did that 100 times while they were little; I guess I just wasn’t thinking about this possibility!

    Comment by DBurns — 10:32 am August 28, 2014 #

  49. Asking questions is neither rude, un-compassionate, nor blaming the victim. It’s how we ascertain facts and progress in our vigilance as a society in thwarting cavalier criminals and keeping our loved ones safe. While my heart races when I even think of being in the father’s shoes yesterday, it doesn’t mean pausing, reflecting, asking questions, and thinking of ways to ensure this doesn’t happen again is off the table. So many are so quick to judge these days, instead of just getting the facts, our thin skins will leave us vulnerable if we don’t pay heed to lessons learned. I’m sure the father will not repeat the same steps ever again, and I’m in no way condemning him when I say that. It’s sad we can’t trust those around us in our own communities, but there’s a reason we heard “better safe than sorry” a lot growing up. Viewing the video, it looks like the car might even have been left running, which a concerned parent might do to keep the AC running on a hot day, so the baby is comfortable, while having no idea that a brazen criminal might steal the car – even with a kid inside! None of this makes the Dad a bad guy in any way. Probably just a parent with multiple tasks at hand and things on his mind, who let his guard down for a few seconds right where a shark he didn’t see was circling. We can all learn from this and should.

    Comment by pjmanley — 12:29 pm August 28, 2014 #

  50. @sophista-tiki: We’re stuck in a rut over the crime issues, because almost any time they are brought up, accusations of class-warfare, better/well-heeled neighborhoods, etc. arise and thwart the discussion. Personally, I don’t live in Westwood, but I’m there all the time, for shopping, sports, dining out, etc., and to me, West Seattle is West Seattle, and at times I’m a lot more scared of what’s happening at Alki Beach than Westwood. We’ve also got a “stand-down” protest among some of our police force, politicians who worry more about leafy boulevards than public safety and buses that run on time, etc., etc. I see lots of stuff that concerns me all over West Seattle, but if I mention it, I’ve got the homeless lobby, the mental illness lobby, the various neighborhood lobbies, etc., jumping my insensitivity, callousness, heartlessness, etc. That said, the level of crime, filth, and anti-social behavior we are currently tolerating in West Seattle is atrocious. I overheard a Jefferson Square Safeway employee telling a customer that they are not to confront liquor thieves for fear of causing a big scene, getting hurt or hurting someone. So instead they have an employee posted in the liquor aisle almost all day long. Which means, all concerns aside, we’ve surrendered the fight on some levels, and I don’t think things are going to get better until people stand up and push-back as hard against thugs and criminals as they push for bike lanes and tree-lined streets. Priorities.

    Comment by pjmanley — 12:56 pm August 28, 2014 #

  51. Yes we assumed he had a keyless start because he was frantically pushing on his key button

    Comment by christine drake — 1:16 pm August 28, 2014 #

  52. and it was pointed out to me by a new mother I know (daughter – lol), that no amount of punishing this guy for leaving his child unattended will be as much as the punishment he gives himself. (or his wife gives him !).

    Comment by JanS — 5:56 pm August 28, 2014 #

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Article source: http://westseattleblog.com/2014/08/seattle-police-searching-for-stolen-car-with-child-inside/