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Vermont Cop Pulls Car Over for Nonexistent Traffic Violation, Tows It to …

ACLU of VermontACLU of VermontLast March, according to a

lawsuit
filed this month by the ACLU of Vermont, a state
trooper pulled Gregory Zullo over for a nonexistent traffic
infraction, then towed his car away so it could be searched for
evidence of a nonexistent crime.

Trooper Lewis Hatch stopped Zullo, a 21-year-old resident of
Rutland, on Route 7 in Wallingford around 3 p.m. on March 6,
ostensibly because snow partially obscured the registration sticker
on his rear license plate. But as the ACLU points out, that is not
a traffic violation under Vermont law. In fact, the complaint says,
“Mr. Zullo was perfectly obeying all applicable traffic laws when
driving through Wallingford that day.”

After detaining Zullo for an hour and unsuccessfully pressing
him for permission to search the car, Hatch had it towed to the
local state police barracks. In his
application
for a warrant to search the car, Hatch
claimed to have smelled “the faint odor of burnt marijuana
coming from within the vehicle.” He also mentioned seeing an air
freshener and eye drops in the car, and he reported that a
drug-sniffing dog at the state police barracks “alerted twice on
the trunk,” then “climbed up on the hood.” In Vermont, the ACLU
argues, such evidence does not constitute probable cause to believe
a search will reveal evidence of a crime, since possessing up to an
ounce of marijuana is no longer a crime in that state, which last
year made it a civil offense.

Hatch
reported
that he found a pipe and a grinder in Zullo’s car,
both containing “marijuana residue.” (Did he find them in the
trunk, to which the dog supposedly alerted? Hatch did not say.)
Zullo was not charged with any offense, since there was none to
charge him with. But he did not get his car back until about 10
p.m., seven hours after he was stopped. “To add insult to injury,”

says
ACLU of Vermont Executive Director Allen Gilbert, “the
state police made him pay $150 for the tow, as if the situation was
his fault.”

The ACLU is asking a Vermont Superior Court judge to find that
Hatch violated the state constitution’s search-and-seizure restrictions
by stopping Zullo without reasonable suspicion that he had
committed a traffic violation, forcing him out of his car without
reasonable suspicion that he was committing a crime or posed a
danger to others, and towing and searching his car without probable
cause to believe it contained evidence of a crime. Zullo also wants
his $150 back and reimbursement of his legal costs, plus
unspecified damages for the violations of his rights.

The traffic stop was recorded
by a dashcam on Hatch’s SUV, which missed most of the audio because
Hatch did not take the microphone with him went he went over to
Zullo’s car. (See video below.) According to the complaint, Hatch
said he was on the lookout for heroin traffickers but conceded he
did not suspect Zullo of heroin trafficking. While talking to the
trooper, who repeatedly asked for permission to search the car,
Zullo admitted that he might have smoked marijuana within the
previous two or three days.

When Hatch checked for prior offenses, he found that Zullo had
faced a minor marijuana possession charge in March 2013 that was
dropped six months later. Then Hatch instructed Zullo to exit the
car and informed him for the first time of the official
justification for the stop: the snow on his bumper. The complaint
notes that “Hatch had no difficulty reading Mr. Zullo’s rear
license plate or the validating sticker affixed to the rear
license plate.” It adds that “throughout the entire traffic stop,
[Hatch] did not brush any snow off of the rear bumper of Mr.
Zullo’s car, or take any other measure to uncover the allegedly
obscured validating sticker.” 

Zullo agreed to a search of his pockets but continued to
withhold consent for a search of his car. Hatch, who was joined by
another trooper during the stop, persisted, threatening to impound
the car and claiming the police dog in the back of his SUV had
smelled something suspicious. According to the ACLU, the dog, which
never left the SUV, was not even trained to detect drugs. Hatch
would not let Zullo retrieve his cellphone and money from the car,
and he refused to give him a ride to the state police barracks,
leaving him in the cold on the side of the road, about eight
miles from his home.

While waiting for the tow truck, Hatch placed a telephone call,
beginning around the 32:05 mark on the video. Here are excerpts
from Hatch’s side of that conversation:

I can smell weed, and he won’t allow me to search it, so I’m
just going to take it….First he said last night. Now he’s saying
it was two nights ago….It’s stupid, but whatever; that’s what he
wants to do….Uh, yeah, he had a bunch of snow on his back license
plate. I couldn’t see it. I couldn’t see the registration
sticker….I’m gonna kick him loose. He’s a local Rutland
kid….Yeah, he let me search him. He won’t let me search the car,
and then, you know, he kept wanting to go back to his car. I had to
kinda grab him. And I’m like, “Listen, if you try and go to your
car, I’m going to detain you, so stop trying to get your stuff.”
 

Hatch is right: This situation is stupid, but not for the
reasons he thinks. Hatch was dismayed that Zullo obstinately
insisted the cops stay out of his car and that he bizarrely seemed
to think he had a right to his own possessions. To Hatch’s mind,
people who want to avoid the inconvenience and indignity that Zullo
suffered should simply cooperate by waiving their constitutional
rights. Or to put it
another way
: If you don’t want your car towed, do what I tell
you.

In Massachusetts, where voters decriminalized marijuana
possession in 2008, the state’s Supreme Judicial Court has followed
the logic urged by the ACLU of Vermont, ruling that a whiff of pot,
whether burned or

fresh
, does not by itself justify a car search.

[Thanks to Marc Sandhaus for the tip.]

Article source: http://reason.com/blog/2014/09/30/vermont-state-trooper-pulls-a-man-over-f

Aluminum Cans Can Work! Ford Releases 2015 F-150 Max Towing and Hauling …

2015 Ford F-150 Lariat 4x42015 Ford F-150 Lariat 4x4
Ford has promised that its new aluminum-bodied 2015 F-150 pickup would set new standards in capability from the moment the sheet came off the truck in January. It’s the sort of marketing speak that typically draws eye rolls—but it turns out Ford wasn’t joking.

According to the 2015 F-150′s officially stated towing and payload numbers, the thing will be able to tow up to 12,200 pounds and haul up to 3300 pounds in the bed. The latter figure is particularly impressive, as the Chevrolet Silverado and Ram 1500 models can officially haul just 2270 and 1900 pounds in their beds. The F-150’s trailering figure bests the Ram’s top tow rating of 10,650 pounds and squeaks by the Chevrolet Silverado 1500’s max trailer weight of 12,000 pounds.

2015 Ford F-150 2.7L EcoBoost Crew Cab 4x42015 Ford F-150 2.7L EcoBoost Crew Cab 4x4
Of course, the numbers are seldom all that cold or hard when it comes to full-size trucks. While every truck shopper should be happy to see numbers like this, Ford didn’t break down its numbers by body style or configuration (although the top tow rating requires the 3.5-liter EcoBoost V-6, and peak payload comes courtesy of the 5.0-liter V-8), so it remains difficult to draw any apples-to-apples comparisons. It’s worth noting, however, that Ford spokesman Mike Levine told us that these calculations are the result of following SAE-recommended practices, which state that the manufacturer should keep the entire vehicle intact when determining ratings. Ford, if you recall, was one of the few manufacturers not following the practices—in that case for its Super Duty trucks—before reversing course earlier this month.

Even if Ford didn’t follow the SAE’s guidelines, though—and particularly when it comes to payload—the F-150 appears to have enough of a commanding lead that it could probably have six bumpers removed from each end and still come out ahead. And in any case, the ratings prove that aluminum—“high-strength, military-grade” aluminum, anyway—can work for trucks. We’re looking forward to loading one up ourselves and putting it through its paces soon.

2015 Ford F-150 Lariat 4x42015 Ford F-150 Lariat 4x4

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Article source: http://blog.caranddriver.com/aluminum-cans-can-work-ford-releases-2015-f-150-max-towing-and-hauling-ratings/

Walmart blames Tracy Morgan for car crash injuries

Walmart says comedian Tracy Morgan is to blame for the near-fatal injuries he suffered when one of the mega-retailer’s tractor-trailers plowed into his limousine on the New Jersey Turnpike — because the “30 Rock” star wasn’t wearing his seatbelt.

“Plaintiff’s injuries, if any, were caused … by plaintiff’s failure to properly wear an appropriate available seatbelt restraint device,” the company said in court papers filed in New Jersey federal court Monday, responding to Morgan’s July lawsuit against Walmart.

“By failing to exercise ordinary care in making use of available seatbelts … plaintiff acted unreasonably and in disregard of [their] own interests.”

But the funny man’s attorney, Benedict Morelli said Walmart is way off the mark in trying to blame Morgan, 45, for the serious injuries he suffered in the crash, which left him hospitalized for weeks.

Walmart, he said, bears full responsibility for their driver smashing into the Mercedes-Benz limo carrying Morgan and several friends — killing James “Jimmy Mack” McNair and seriously injuring two other comics — because the world’s largest retailer allegedly forces drivers to log too many hours.

Tracy Morgan is seen using a walker as he exits his New Jersey home on July 14.Photo: David McGlynn

“After Walmart told the public and their customers that they would take full responsibility, they put responsibility on my clients and the deceased — which I think is despicable,” said Morelli, adding that it’s not known for certain whether Morgan and the other passengers were wearing seat belts.

“Tracy is struggling and struggling and he’s sitting in a wheelchair and they’re blaming him. It’s disgusting.”

Morgan was returning from a stand-up show at a casino in Delaware on June 7 when the Walmart tractor-trailer slammed into his limo.

Authorities blamed the crash on truck driver Kevin Roper, 35, of Jonesboro, Ga. He was driving 20 mph over the speed limit, had fallen asleep at the wheel and had been awake for more than 24 hours before the crash, according to the assault and death-by-auto charges against him.

Roper has pleaded not guilty to the charges.

Walmart stonewalls in much of its response, repeating over and over again that it is “unable to admit or deny” various allegations made by Morgan.

Article source: http://pagesix.com/2014/09/29/walmart-blames-tracy-morgan-for-injuries-sustained-in-car-crash/

Tony Stewart breaks his silence

On Monday, NASCAR Sprint Cup Series driver and car-owner Tony Stewart answered questions from the media during a press conference at Stewart-Haas Racing. It was the first time Stewart spoke publicly since making a statement prior to his return to Sprint Cup competition at Atlanta Motor Speedway in late August.

Stewart didn’t answer questions specifically explaining the chain of events that led to the death of Kevin Ward Jr. at Canandaigua (N.Y.) Motorsports Park on Aug. 9, aside from stressing the the incident that led to Ward’s death was an accident.

Stewart, instead, explained his own grieving process and what his life has been like during the period of time since the Canandaigua incident. He also expressed appreciation for fans and friends who have welcomed him back to racing and supported him during his still-ongoing grieving process.

Here’s what he had to say:

Q. Tony, since the accident, when you think of Kevin Ward, Jr., what comes to mind?

TONY STEWART: Honestly, before the accident I didn’t know Kevin. I don’t even know how many times I had raced with him. I race with that group a couple times a year. They’ve always been a great group to race with, but I didn’t know him. Obviously, after the accident I’ve read a lot about him, and from what I’ve read, I think he had a really promising career as a Sprint Car driver. It sounded like he was doing a good job and learning a lot at a young age, so I think he had a lot to look forward to.

Q. Do you want to and need to talk to the Ward family to have any sort of closure? If so, can you talk to him or will it be years before all the legal stuff is done before you can talk to them?

TONY STEWART: You know, I think at this point it’s — I want to be available to them if they want to talk about it. At this point, I don’t need to talk to them for closure. I know what happened, and I know it was an accident, but I’m offering to talk to them to help them, if it helps them with closure. So I said it when we were in Atlanta, and I still believe that I want to be available to them if and when they ever want to talk.

Q. On the topic of closure, at some point the focus will turn back to your career as a race car driver. Have you thought about when or how that can happen?

TONY STEWART: Well, I mean, we’ve been racing since Atlanta, obviously, but it’s not been business as usual by any means, and this is going to be a healing process for me. It makes you think about a lot of things other than driving race cars, but the one thing that’s probably helped me more than anything is being back at the racetrack and being around my racing family and remembering that I have a passion for what I do. So that’s probably helped me more than anything when it’s come to trying to make that next step to move forward.

Q. If you could do anything differently over the past couple months, what would it be?

TONY STEWART: I’d have stayed at Watkins Glen that night. You know, I do this stuff and I go run those cars to have a good time and that’s all I wanted to do that night. I wanted to go have fun. I had just spent the week at Knoxville, and it gives you the edge and desire to want to go race. It wasn’t a big paying race for Sprint Car standards. I just wanted to go run my Sprint Car for a night. I do it to have fun, and it didn’t end up being fun that night.

Q. How have you been spending the time since the accident happened, and will your routine change now that you’ve been exonerated?

TONY STEWART: Since we went back to Atlanta, basically, I go from the motorhome to the car, and the car to the trailer, and the trailer back to the car, and that’s literally all I’ve done since I came back. Even after Wednesday here in Charlotte, I haven’t left my house. It’s just an awkward feeling. I think now I’ll start doing some more things. I mean, I’ve got a lot of friends who have been supportive through this entire thing, and there are a lot of people that have shown how much they cared and it would be nice to go and visit and talk to those people again.

Q. Have you reconsidered or considered stopping driving sprint cars as a result of this and your injury the year before?

TONY STEWART: At this point I don’t really have — I’m not going to say I’m never going to get in one. But when I got hurt, it was as soon as I got healed and as soon as things got settled in with the Cup car I was set that I was wanting to get in one, but right now I wouldn’t even be able to give you a small idea of if and when I’ll ever get back in a car. So at this point I won’t be in one for a while.

Q. The life of a driver and an owner is extremely busy. Press conferences, commercials, appearances, fan things, you haven’t done — have you done much of that? When will you think you’d get back to that life?

TONY STEWART: I haven’t done any since the accident. I think after talking with you guys today we’ll start getting back into doing meet and greets and appearances again. I think it’s important for me to do that and to take — I think that’s another step of making forward progress is getting back to trying to resume what was the best of a normal life before this. I think it’s important for me to do that and get back to doing it as soon as possible.

Q. What has been the biggest change within you and the biggest impact upon you as a result of this past month and a half?

TONY STEWART: I honestly think that when you’re — and I’m not going to speak for professional athletes in different forms of sports, but as a race car driver, driving a race car is all that consumed my life. It’s all I thought about, it’s all I cared about, and everything else was second on down the list of priorities for me. I think this has given me the opportunity to sit here and think about other aspects of my life and what they’re going to mean to me in the future.

Not that I don’t love what I do, because I do love it, but it’s not — just like you guys, it’s not what we do all the time. There are more things to our life than what we have as a profession. So it’s made me think about some of those other aspects of my life that kind of have been put on hold for years.

Q. How would you characterize the weeks at home, Tony, following the accident? You basically were in seclusion. What was that like for you to go through that and what did you do?

TONY STEWART: I didn’t really do much of anything to be perfectly honest. I think the first three days that I was home I really didn’t do anything. I didn’t get out of bed. I didn’t care if I took a shower. I left my room to go get food, and that you almost had to make yourself eat. It’s the first three or four days I didn’t want to talk to anybody. Didn’t want to see anybody, I just wanted to be by myself.

You finally get up and you finally start moving around a little bit and every day got a little bit easier, but it was a big, drastic change from what I was used to, for sure, not having the desire to do anything. All you thought about is what happened and asking yourself why. Why did this happen? So you just sat there for entire days on end asking questions and trying to come to terms with what happened and why it happened.

Q. I was at Loudon a couple weeks ago and Jimmie Johnson talked about how people are starting to take sides, and I’m wondering during this process if things coming out on Twitter or people making comments in the media, did you keep yourself insulated from that or did you follow any of that? How did that impact the time that you were at the track?

TONY STEWART: I tried to do my best to insulate myself from that. But I finally started reading what was out there and what people were saying, and you didn’t control that. Last Wednesday the facts came out and people still through the weekend, some people that had the same opinion before the facts came out still have the same opinion, no matter what side they think about.

To me it’s worthless to pick sides. A young man lost his life, and I don’t care what side you’re on, it doesn’t change that. His family’s in mourning. I’m in mourning. My family is in mourning. Picking sides isn’t solving or fixing anything. It’s a waste of time to pick sides. Instead of honoring a young man that had a promising racing career, people are picking sides and throwing — it’s like watching people throw darts at each other. It’s disappointing at this point, honestly, because instead of supporting each other and the racing community is such a strong family, that it’s dividing people that on a daily basis would help each other. There is no point in it. It doesn’t solve anything. It doesn’t fix anything. At the end of the day, it’s not going to make anybody feel any better about it.

It’s just people that — everybody’s entitled to their opinion, and we know that. But everybody, and I’ve seen this for the last seven weeks now, everybody has made their decision and picked their side off of 100% of the information that they got, which is about 10% of all the information that’s truly out there. And we all do it. Our society does it. We do it every day. Whatever we see on the news we make our decision as people about what we see. But it’s not — I don’t think any of us any day whatever topic we’re trying to come to a conclusion about, ever get all the facts.

So you understand why people think the way they do, but I think more than not, I don’t think people realize that there is more information out there than what we all get on a daily basis about whatever it is.

Q. (No Microphone)?

TONY STEWART: I guess it was more disappointing to me than anything. Even from people that were supportive of us. I mean, listened and reading comments about the sheriff’s department and the district attorney, they did a good job of taking the time that they needed to do to get all the facts and to come to a very thought out conclusion of this. You want to sit there and tell people, hey, let them do their job. But it just shows how passionate people are.

I mean, if they are on our side or on Kevin’s family’s side, they were passionate about that. That’s something I don’t want to see go away. I don’t want to see people lose their passion, but I think people need to understand that there are a lot more facts that they didn’t understand and haven’t seen.

Q. Tony, obviously the season is moving on. Yesterday Kevin Harvick, great run, Kurt Busch, not as great. How much have you let yourself be engaged in that side of the process right now as far as being the Stewart of Stewart-Haas Racing?

TONY STEWART: I’ve let my team down from that standpoint. I haven’t been able to — I’ve been a little bit of a cheerleader, but that’s about all I’ve been able to contribute here the last seven weeks. It’s just, like I mentioned earlier, it’s been hard for me to function day-to-day. There hasn’t been anything normal about my life the last seven weeks, so it’s been very hard to try to do anything to be productive to help those guys. You try to be a cheerleader, you try to keep them pumped up about what they’re do being, but other than that, I haven’t been able to contribute too much.

Q. Just wondering, you talk about being in seclusion and all that that’s meant. What does today represent for you having us all here? You called us all here together. What does today represent for you in terms of going forward?

TONY STEWART: We knew everybody had questions and we knew that everybody was going to want answered to what’s going on. But I think more than anything we wanted to be able to tell everything from the beginning. But it’s, like I learned Wednesday, everybody’s got their opinions about what happened. Obviously, the facts didn’t matter to a lot of those people. They still had their opinions one way or the other. We haven’t let anybody know what’s been going on the last six weeks. We just kind of went through the motions as far as we’re concerned, and we knew a lot of you would have questions about what’s been going on the last six or seven weeks and how have we handled it.

Q. What was it like to learn from the district attorney that in the toxicology report, Kevin Ward was under the influence?

TONY STEWART: Honestly, for me, it didn’t change anything. To me a young driver lost his life. Didn’t matter why or what was going on. The end result was the same. No matter what was said, it was still a tragic accident. I just know in my heart that it was a hundred percent an accident; that detail didn’t mean anything to me personally.

Q. You mentioned earlier the awkward feeling that’s come over you the past several weeks. Can you explain that a little more? Also, talk about will that ever go away given that Kevin Ward has passed away and that will not change?

TONY STEWART: It’s just been awkward because I know what a typical day was like for me and the things that were on my agenda for each day and what I thought about you kind of get in that pattern. This was something that obviously changed that pattern drastically. Everything you thought about, everything you worked on, you stop thinking about. You stopped working on, and this is all you thought about.

Ask me the second part again.

Q. Do you think that will eventually go away?

TONY STEWART: I think it will. The reason I say that is I’ve had other people that I’ve known for years that have come to me and told me personal stories of tragedies that have happened in their life that a lot of us don’t know about. Their experiences and their advice really has hit home for me. I do believe as time goes on it will be different every day. It may. I don’t know if it will ever get back to normal, but it will get better.

Q. Since getting back in a car, rate your performance as a driver?

TONY STEWART: I could rate a before and after almost the same. My year hasn’t been a stellar year by any means. When we came back, we had a decent day started in Atlanta, and had an incident that derailed it. But I think yesterday was probably the best overall race from start to finish that we’ve run. Probably one of the best ones this year that we’ve actually run. I struggled on restarts. I couldn’t get going very good the first three or four laps, but it seemed like after ten laps or 15 laps we were settling into a pace that was a top 5 race car.

So we didn’t have any major dramas on either side during the whole race. We actually put a whole race together. I know the 14th or 15th place finish isn’t anything to brag about, but considering where our season has been, we finally put together a whole day that was consistent, and that meant a lot to us.

Q. Tony, it’s kind of a follow-up, Doug asked you about your NASCAR involvement with Stewart-Haas Racing. Your short track industry, your empire with Eldora and your USAC teams, and the World of Outlaw teams, what’s that been like for you over the last seven weeks?

TONY STEWART: I’ve watched and paid attention to what was going on, but I haven’t been engaged in it. I’ve watched our races that we had online at Eldora. I’ve watched the Sprint Car races online and listened to them online, but haven’t been engaged with the teams, haven’t been engaged with the drivers. Just kind of been an non-deal.

Q. I don’t know quite how to phrase this, but racing inherently is a dangerous sport. You’ve seen guys get killed in accidents over the years. If this would have been a situation where you guys were racing and he crashed, and he perished in the crash, would it be something you would feel different about? Or does the nature of him coming out on the track, did that change at all for you? Does that make sense?

TONY STEWART: Yeah, it does. For me, I don’t think it would change anything. I’ve worked really hard, especially when I got hurt last year, while I was healing, I spent all that time trying to defend Sprint Car racing and help — try to help other drivers through the off-season. I do it because I’m passionate about it and I love it. We all know what can happen every time we get in a race car, whether it’s an IndyCar, Stock Car, Sprint Car. Anybody that races anything knows what that is and what that danger is and what can happen.

I’ve had close friends die in race cars. I’ve had teammates die in race cars, and there is nothing easy about it. Like I said, the racing community is a very close-knit family. Anytime you lose somebody in that family, there are drivers and team owners and crew members from other sports that may not have ever met that driver but feel for that family and that driver in their tragedy.

So no matter what the circumstances, the end result is something that nobody ever wants to see. Like I said, I’ve spent a lot of time trying to defend it and try to help promote the sport, and none of us want that to happen to anybody under any circumstances.

Q. This is a secondary thing, but it will be important if it hasn’t been already, how are you dealing with sponsors? How are you talking to sponsors about moving forward and what kind of concerns do you have about them being loyal to the team after this?

TONY STEWART: It’s a legitimate question, for sure. Our organization has stayed in close contact with the sponsors through this whole ordeal, and I’ve been able to talk to a couple of them as well. Johnny Morris was one of the people that came to my house to see me while I was in Indiana. We spoke to people from Mobil 1, and they came to see us the last couple weeks at the racetrack. The support from them has been amazing.

It’s obviously a tough circumstance for anybody to be a part of it, for a corporation to be part of it as well, but they’ve been very supportive through this whole process. I can’t speak to what the future will be for them. They’ve been supportive to this point and that’s something I’ve been very grateful for.

Q. First of all, welcome back. Glad to see you. Following up a little on what Steven said. You own Sprint Car teams and own tracks and specifically Eldora. It was almost a therapy for you to get to go up and ride around on a four-wheeler and get the shoes dirty and the hands dirty. Has this incident taken away from the cleansing properties of that therapy? Do you think you’ll ever be able to ride Eldora in the four wheeler and feel the same again?

TONY STEWART: I’m sure I will. It’s just not right now. That’s an important aspect of my life and something that’s very important to me. Right now at this moment today there are other things that are important to me right now, and they still are. But I’m not ready to go do that yet. Going around in a Cup car right now is important to me, and the great thing Eldora and the dirt track teams and our drivers that do great things there, and that’s given me — afforded me the time to think about what I need to do right now.

Q. You talked briefly about your race yesterday. It’s been the best race you’ve had in your five back. Is there any correlation personally in how you performed yesterday to being able to move forward in the decision Wednesday?

TONY STEWART: I really don’t know if it does or not, to be honest. Honestly, at the racetrack on Friday and Saturday we struggled. Our qualifying effort was the best that I qualified at Dover in a long time, but we really struggled in practice leading up to that, and Saturday all day we struggled. I thought Chad and the engineers did a good job Saturday night of taking all the information they learned on both days, and I could tell right off the bat on Sunday that the car was quite a bit different than the rest of the weekend.

I don’t think it had anything to do with that, honestly. I think getting back in the car every time I’ve gotten in there, it’s given me a chance to focus again, and that’s something that I’ve needed as a diversion. But I think from the time that I went back to Atlanta, the first session there the car felt really good, and we had a good weekend in Atlanta until it got derailed.

But I think at this point in my career as a driver, when you make that decision to put the helmet on you have to know in your heart that you’re ready to go, you’re ready to do it, and I felt comfortable in the car from day one.

Q. You’re a championship level driver on the track, and sort of a larger-than-life figure off of it, which is responsible for all of this. Can you get back to that person that you were, that gregarious, likeable sort of guy, or is it going to be a while that you’re that personality that fans have been drawn to all these years?

TONY STEWART: I think the support we’ve had from our fans, I don’t know if they even care if we get back to that. They’re just happy that we’re back right now, and that’s been very comforting for us and for me. I’ve really appreciated their support and how they’ve helped welcome me back to the track.

It’s hard to say to be honest. I appreciate the fact that you said I was a nice guy. This is a process that’s day-to-day. You take it one day at a time. Before the accident happened, a day would fly by, and now a day seems like two or three days. The clock seems like the batteries are running low on the clock. I honestly think every day things will get better, and things will get easier, and I think it will for Kevin’s family as well. Time heals.

Like I said, I don’t know that it will ever be normal again, but we’ll find a place to settle into and we’ll do the best we can like we have to this point. Whether I ever get back to that or not, hopefully through this I will somehow be a better person. That’s all I can hope for.

Q. Until last Wednesday, there was the very real possibility of facing charges, which seems very scary. In your grief or in getting over what happened in the accident, were you able to separate that part? Were you fearful of charges, and how did you deal with that aspect of it?

TONY STEWART: I think you said it best yourself right there. Anytime you’re facing something like that and your fate is in someone else’s hands, it’s natural to be fearful. But all along I knew what the facts are. I knew what had happened, and I know what happened. I think through the process of the sheriff’s department and the district attorney and going to a 23-person grand injury, all the facts were presented and their decision spoke. It was what I knew.

So I can’t say that — I would be lying if I said there wasn’t a piece of relief, but that was very short lived in my heart. Because as quickly as it was relief in my heart, it was at the same time it went right back to the fact that we lost Kevin. We lost a young driver that had a lot of talent.

Q. You discussed the early days and not wanting to do anything but being secluded. What thought have you given to hanging it up all together and being done driving?

TONY STEWART: You know, even with the decision right now, I don’t know if and when I’ll ever get back in a Sprint Car. I said the support from the fans and the support from peers and people that were around every day, I’ve had drivers I’ve raced with every week and drivers that I haven’t raced with for months that said don’t let this keep you from doing what you love.

This is what I’ve done all my life. This is what I’ve done for 36 years, and I wouldn’t change anything about it. I love what I do. I love driving race cars, but I think it might change right now as far as how much of it and what I do, but there was never a thought in my head about stopping. That would take the life out of me.

Q. Along the lines of what Marty just said, one, how often do you think about the events of what happened? How often do you replay it in your mind? And for a guy that’s passionate about this sport, did it wane at all for the sport?

TONY STEWART: I don’t think your passion ever goes away. Probably more than anything over (no audio), and I wish I could say it was once a day, but it’s not. I think about it a lot every day. That’s the great thing about getting back in the race car because it gives me time to forget about it for a minute and to stop thinking about it. After you get done at the end of the day, you start thinking about it again. It’s not something that goes away. It will never go away. It’s always going to be part of my life the rest of my life. That’s the unfortunate part.

It’s going to be a part of my life. It’s going to be a part of Kevin’s families life, and it’s never going to go away for any of us, but hopefully it will get easier for all of us.

Q. You mentioned replaying what happened in your mind. Have you watched the video of what happened?

TONY STEWART: I’ve seen the video of it, yes.

Q. You said you were disappointed by some of the reaction, but are you hurt by what’s been said about you and your role in this tragedy? Since it’s a sponsor-driven sport, do you feel you need to do or can do anything to repair your reputation?

TONY STEWART: Ask me the first part again. The two part things, I’ve got a short mind.

Q. You said you were disappointed by some of the reaction, but were you hurt by it?

TONY STEWART: Initially, yes. Initially I was hurt by some of the things I read. But then I looked at who they were from, and it’s people that never met me, never spent time with me, don’t know me, and they’re making a judgment off of either what they — either what was presented or what the facts were that they had, and they were people that didn’t like me to begin with and it didn’t matter what the facts were.

I really stopped wasting my time worrying about it. Like I said, I know what happened. I know what the facts are and that’s all that matters.

Q. A lot of these press conferences that have happened throughout the past few weeks, a lot of your fellow drivers asked about this situation. Some of them saying they attempted to reach out to you and talk to you. Some saying they haven’t heard back and that kind of thing. Have there been certain ones that have leaned on and talked to you and helped you get through this?

TONY STEWART: There have. It’s been done behind closed doors and that’s the way I want to keep it on their behalf and my behalf. Yes, there’s been a lot of support, especially when the accident happened. Like I said, I didn’t want to do anything. So there were a lot of text messages and people that have reached out that I’m now starting the process of getting in touch with them and thanking them for their support and explaining why I didn’t get back to them.

That’s probably been one of the hardest parts. The hardest part for me is not having that contact with my friends and my peers, and going to the racetrack was the first step in reconnecting with a lot of those people and being able to thank them for their kind words and their advice. There’s been so much that I’ve learned from my peers, my friends through this whether it’s been through personal experiences or just kind words that they’ve said. That is the advice that they’ve given us that’s really meant a lot. And that’s something that the rest of my life I don’t think I could spend the rest of my life and accurately thank everybody for what they’ve done to help us get through this.

Q. Would you say it’s people inside NASCAR or outside NASCAR?

TONY STEWART: Both. It’s been all across the racing community. Inside NASCAR, outside NASCAR, people I’ve met along the way that aren’t involved in racing at all but are people that understand. So that’s been a huge, huge part for me.

Q. I imagine a substantial moment of vulnerability for you must have been that introduction in Atlanta. First time you’ve been in public, you don’t know what people are thinking. What was it like to walk up there and hear what you heard from the grand stands?

TONY STEWART: At first I thought I accidentally walked out in Dale Jr.’s spot, but it was very overwhelming. I’m glad I had sunglasses on. But it was probably the most flattering and humbling part of my career was to walk out there and have that kind of reception. Riding around in the back of the pick-up truck and seeing people against the fence that were cheering for us and they had Jeff Gordon shirts on and Carl Edwards shirts and Matt Kenseth shirts. Didn’t matter what they had on, it really showed the support. Hearing about at Bristol how something that I was really happy with was the fact that on the 13th lap, people held up 13 for Kevin, and on the 14th lap held it up for us. And I think it shows the kind of bond that race fans and the racing community have with each other.

It was very flattering in Atlanta for sure. I’ll never forget that moment.

Q. You talked about in the article with the Associated Press last week about how (No Audio)?

TONY STEWART: I think our whole life I don’t think any of us ever read anything in a book at school or read anything on how to deal with a tragedy like this. To have somebody there that could help us through that and help us be able to make forward progress was very important, and it’s still — we’re still using them. It’s not something that gets back to normal overnight.

It’s something we’ll deal with a for a long time, but it’s nice to have that kind of support and that kind of guidance that will help you learn how to cope with it, deal with it, and start moving on.

Follow Stock Car Spin on Twitter @SCSblog or like Stock Car Spin on Facebook. Amanda’s also on Twitter @NASCARexaminer and has a fan/like page on Facebook: NASCAR Examiner

 

Article source: http://stockcarspin.com/2014/09/29/tony-stewart-breaks-silence/

Suck It, Mustang: 2016 Chevrolet Camaro Loses More Camo, Comes Into …

2016 Chevrolet Camaro SS (spy photo)2016 Chevrolet Camaro SS (spy photo)
A lighter and tighter Chevrolet Camaro this way comes. We last checked in on Chevy’s future pony car a few months ago, when we published aerial spy photographs of the car being evaluated at General Motors’ proving ground. That prototype was well-camouflaged, but its general shape gave it away as the 2016 Camaro. The car pictured here is clearly a Camaro, and its details are now on clearer display—and from a more normal vantage point.

Now that the Camaro has shed its bulky cover-up, we can speak to the car’s design. The form-fitting camouflage on this prototype reveals styling that’s largely evolutionary in its graphics. Thin headlights once again flow into a full-width grille, only a large central lower intake now resides in the front fascia, and the hood has sprouted some softer contours. The car’s overhangs seem shorter, and the greenhouse takes on more of a fastback style. Overall, the Camaro appears more lithe, and it bears more than a passing resemblance to the Camaro-based, GM-designed Bumblebee from the latest Transformers movie.

2016 Chevrolet Camaro SS (spy photo)2016 Chevrolet Camaro SS (spy photo)

The car’s svelte appearance is harmoniously congruent with what is expected to be some actual svelteness. Chevrolet’s quest for a lighter-weight Camaro starts and ends with the new car’s platform. Unlike today’s model, which utilizes chopped-down full-size-sedan underpinnings, the 2016 model will switch to GM’s rear-drive Alpha architecture, which is flexible enough to sit beneath both the Cadillac ATS and CTS. Size-wise, the Camaro will hew closer to the ATS. (Those earlier spy photos appear to confirm that the Chevy’s wheelbase will be close—if not identical—to the Cadillac ATS coupe’s.)

Stripping weight from the Camaro can only help its expected range of V-6 and naturally aspirated and supercharged V-8 engine options, and it could even open the door for GM’s corporate turbocharged 2.0-liter four-cylinder. Adding the four to the mix could give Chevy a way to stick it to the four-pot 2015 Ford Mustang EcoBoost. A six-speed manual transmission carries on, while GM’s new eight-speed automatic should serve as the self-shifter option.



Eager Camaro fans fear not: Time is on your side in the wait for the new car. As we previously reported, the new Chevrolet Camaro coupe will debut next year before going on sale late in 2015 as a ’16 model. Pricing shouldn’t stray far from the current ’Maro’s $24,550 base sticker, and a convertible version eventually will follow the coupe to market.

2016 Chevrolet Camaro SS (spy photo)2016 Chevrolet Camaro SS (spy photo)

Other Stories You Might Like


Article source: http://blog.caranddriver.com/suck-it-mustang-2016-chevrolet-camaro-loses-more-camo-comes-into-clearer-focus/

2014 Week 4 CAR at BAL Rapid Reaction

Tags:

Steve Smith, Baltimore Ravens, Joe Flacco, Justin Forsett, 2014 Week 4 Rapid Reaction, 2014 Week 4 CAR at BAL, 2014 Week 4 CAR at BAL Rapid Reaction

Article source: http://espn.go.com/blog/nflnation/tag/_/name/2014-week-4-car-at-bal-rapid-reaction

NFL Nation: 2014 Week 4 CAR at BAL

Tags:

Carolina Panthers, Thomas Davis, Charles Godfrey, Cam Newton, Josh Norman, 2014 Week 4 NFL Buzz, 2014 Week 4 CAR at BAL

Article source: http://espn.go.com/blog/nflnation/tag/_/name/2014-week-4-car-at-bal

Tesla Plans Hong Kong Expansion to Tap Electric Car Demand – Analyst Blog

Tesla Motors, Inc.

(
TSLA

) plans to expand its operations in Hong Kong to establish
sustainable transportation in the city, according to sources. 
Tesla expects its operations in Hong Kong to lead the way for
electric vehicle success in Asia. Deemed to be the Norway of Asia
by the company, China offers substantial growth opportunities.

Tesla currently employs 50 people and expects to double the
strength by the end of the year. The company has also hired a
country director for China. Moreover, the Chinese government’s
support for electric vehicle production for sustainable
transportation encourages the company.

Being a small territory spanning across 10 miles, customers in Hong
Kong are expected to charge their vehicles only once a week, which
is an added advantage apart from the environment angle.

Notably, Tesla started operating in China this year and is
undertaking different measures to expand its dealerships and
charging stations in the country. It also expects that China sales
will be on par with that of the U.S. by 2015. Tesla further plans
to produce 100,000 premium electric cars by late next year and also
sell at least 500,000 cars annually worldwide by then.

Tesla also intends to establish new stores, service centers and a
Supercharger network in China. The electric carmaker further plans
to open 10 to 12 stores in China by the end of 2014 and has
inaugurated its flagship store in Beijing in Nov 2013. Tesla
expects China to account for 30-35% of its global sales growth in
2014. Additionally, Tesla aims to start vehicle manufacturing in
China by 2017-2018.

Currently, Tesla sports a Zacks Rank #1 (Strong Buy).

Other well-performing auto stocks worth considering include Advance
Auto Parts Inc. (
AAP

), O’Reilly Automotive Inc. (
ORLY

) and Fox Factory Holding Corp (
FOXF

). All these stocks have a Zacks Rank #2 (Buy).

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Today, you can download 7 Best Stocks for the Next 30 Days.
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Article source: http://www.nasdaq.com/article/tesla-plans-hong-kong-expansion-to-tap-electric-car-demand-analyst-blog-cm395800

Why self-driving cars could soon roam Fayette’s streets


Political Insider with Jim Galloway

Posted: 8:47 am Wednesday, September 24th, 2014

By Greg Bluestein

The golf carts roaming the streets of Fayette County could soon be joined by driverless cars.

The Fayette County Commission has adopted a resolution allowing the county to be a pilot site for the vehicles, and chair Steve Brown said he’s talked to Google about using Fayette as a test site. Now he’s hoping for a meeting with Gov. Nathan Deal to hash out the plans.

Brown told WSB:

“Fayette County has the least traffic congestion of metro counties, so for a company like Google that wants to log a lot of miles, we’d be the perfect place, because they wouldn’t be bogged down in traffic,” Brown told Channel 2’s Rachel Stockman.
 
“We (Georgia) missed a lot of opportunities because we weren’t prepared for the Internet boom, but I think with this, we’d be out in front,” Brown said.

He’s got competition. Google and other firms testing self-driving cars are preparing to expand across the nation, and the Decaturish blog reports that Avondale’s mayor is also pushing for the DeKalb County town to be a test site for driverless cars.

***

Georgia’s actually in the middle of the pack when it comes to statewide advertising spending. At least when the metrics only involve the governor’s race.

An analysis by The Center for Public Integrity shows that some $5.3 million has been spent on statewide races in Georgia this year, about 78 cents per eligible voter. It doesn’t include the heaps of advertising spent on the race for the open Senate seat, a federal contest not included in the analysis.

Gov. Nathan Deal and Democrat Jason Carter have both spent about $2.2 million on ads boosting their candidacy. The center’ estimates show about $380,000 of Deal’s ads that in some way target his opponent, while Carter has spent about $200,000 on those “mixed” ads.

The heavyweight in the race so far is the Republican Governors Association, which has already spent $1.6 million and unleashed another round of campaign ads yesterday. The Center’s analysis showed about $780,000 worth of TV ads from the GOP group, all of them negative.

About $120,000 was spent on TV ads for legislative campaigns, much of it boosting the candidacy of Republican John Kennedy for a state Senate seat.

***

The League of Conservation Voters Action Fund endorsed Democrat Michelle Nunn’s Senate campaign, citing her work conserving”iconic landscapes and protecting wildlife.”

The green group’s endorsement comes despite her support for the controversial Keystone pipeline, long a bugaboo for environmental activists.

“Georgians want leaders who will create jobs in renewable energy that can’t be outsourced and who will protect Georgia’s natural landscapes with common sense and a collaborative spirit,” said Nunn.

Republican David Perdue’s campaign depicted the group as liberal and out-of-touch with everyday Georgians and tied her, as it is wont to do, to President Barack Obama and his “failed energy policies.”

***

Republicans seized on a WXIA telecast where Michelle Nunn tried to sidestep a question about employment discrimination complaints filed against her nonprofit.

The campaign’s infamous leaked memos, released over the summer, identify two complaints as a potential vulnerability. But the documents haven’t been released and Nunn’s campaign seems in no hurry to do so.

WXIA’s Doug Richards asked her about the complaints in the above video.

“I’m hearing this from you for the first time,” she told him.


About the Author

Greg Bluestein is a political reporter who covers the governor’s office and state politics for The Atlanta Journal-Constitution. He joined the newspaper in June 2012.

nbsp
Livefyre

dreluv

dreluv

5pts

Your leader Cruz not from America and Mario Rublo is not American or his parents.

dreluv

dreluv

5pts

Breaking News Georgia democrat have register 120,000 new voters and numbers are rising.

Georgia is turning blue November 4

IReportYouWhine

IReportYouWhine

5pts

White House press-pool reports are supposed to be the news media’s eyes and ears on the president, an independent chronicle of his public activities. They are written by reporters for other reporters, who incorporate them into news articles about President Obama almost every day.


Sometimes, however, the White House plays an unseen role in shaping the story.


Journalists who cover the White House say Obama’s press aides have demanded — and received — changes in press-pool reports before the reports have been disseminated to other journalists. They say the White House has used its unusual role as the distributor of the reports as leverage to steer coverage in a more favorable direction.


http://www.washingtonpost.com/lifestyle/style/reporters-say-white-house-sometimes-demands-changes-to-press-pool-reports/2014/09/23/e5e6fec8-42d9-11e4-9a15-137aa0153527_story.html

Nah, the fascists would never lie about the weather or unemployment rates or health “care” or foreign policy or economic recoveries or …………..

fact

IReportYouWhine

IReportYouWhine

5pts

Don’t like low wages? Stop importing millions of impoverished immigrants from around the world. Too hard to understand? For a democrat, yes, it is.

IReportYouWhine

IReportYouWhine

5pts

 Speaking about such modest restrictions on abortion as have been enacted over the past several years, Justice Ginsburg lamented that “the impact of all these restrictions is on poor women.” Then she added: “It makes no sense as a national policy to promote birth only among poor people.”



This is not her first time weighing in on the question of what by any intellectually honest standard must be described as eugenics. In an earlier interview, she described the Roe v. Wade decision as being intended to control population growth, “particularly growth in populations that we don’t want to have too many of.”



http://www.nationalreview.com/article/388757/we-only-whisper-it-kevin-d-williamson

She’s talking about you, democrat voters.

MichaelHannigan

MichaelHannigan

5pts

I, for one, am still waiting for the leftist, socialist liberal weenies on this blog to explain that having little Jason as Governor is going to make a difference.  Uh, do you suppose the state governing bodies House and Senate – now controlled by the GOP, are going to roll over and do his bidding?  Please let us all know how he is going to get his agendas passed?

dreluv

dreluv

5pts

td1234 only thing you know is to bash President Obama what does he have do with Georgia election.

Georgia republican have destroy our state.

Nathan Deal=crook

David Perdue=liar

Michelle Nunn and Jason Carter have to fix this mess that Georgia Republican have left when we vote them out.

President Obama had to fix Bush mess and our wonderful president doing a great job.

td1234 if you not happy with president Obama just leave and move to another country.

Btw want you move to Russia with all your other communist friends.

Georgia is turning blue November 4

td1234

td1234

5pts

Nunn and Carter = Obama and will support the Obama agenda. 

A vote for Nunn or Carter is a vote for Obama and the Obama agenda. 

IReportYouWhine

IReportYouWhine

5pts

“No mentioning of obama’s name for the next six weeks.”

CherokeeCounty

CherokeeCounty

5pts

@IReportYouWhine 

Since you can’t post your trash at Kyle’s anymore, I’ve read a few of your posts.  After just a day or so I realized that you have absolutely no morals – no lie is too small for you.

(At least you’re not gay, I guess…)

But the death panel lie is one of the most evil, from the pit of hell, lies out there.  There are, and never have been, any death panels.  And your constant reference to them just to scare old people is really and truly disgusting.

But then telling you that you’re a disgusting amoral troglodyte will just get you all excited, I expect.

IReportYouWhine

IReportYouWhine

5pts

Oh, and by the way, should emmanual the ghoul pop himself at 75, perhaps we will entertain the idea. But I know how this works, i.e. swimmer kennedy clinging desperately to the Mayo Clinic and every last bit of their resources.

They’re only talking about you, dimwit.

Kamchak

Kamchak

5pts

@IReportYouWhine 

 Stop importing millions of impoverished immigrants from around the world.

Ronaldo Reaganendez’ 1986 amnesty says, “What?”

DS

DS

5pts

@MichaelHannigan

That is an excellent question. 

I think there’s a lot of interest in getting things done in the Legislature, but Deal drags his feet. 

For example, look at transportation. After T-SPLOST failed, except for transportation districts across central Georgia, which are getting lots of transportation funding now, we haven’t had any movement on a Plan B. Nathan Deal doesn’t want to touch it. 

A study group has been formed to consider plans. I’m cheering them on, even though I have no idea what they’re going to suggest. At least they’re trying.

Nathan Deal doesn’t like trying. Jason Carter does. 

Carter might float some ideas that go nowhere. I have no problem with that. You never know what’s possible until you try.

Georgia is blessed with lots of assets and resources that previous leaders in government and business worked hard to develop. Think of all the risks that Ivan Allen took when he launched aggressive, risky development plans to build up Atlanta. But he inspired others and made it work. We need another Ivan Allen.

Nathan Deal is definitely not like that. He sits around waiting for something to happen, then he tries to jump in and take credit for it.

Jason Carter is willing to try. I think he would be more receptive to ideas coming out of the Georgia legislature. Some might go nowhere, but some might work. We need that kind of energy and can-do attitude.

For me, it isn’t an ideology thing, or a Republican-versus-Democrat thing. It’s about the difference between a do-nothing governor and someone with energy and ideas. 

Kamchak

Kamchak

5pts

@MichaelHannigan 

I, for one, am still waiting for the leftist, socialist liberal weenies on this blog…

I’m waiting for Deal to repay the $3 million due to his unethical behavior.

NWGAL

NWGAL

5pts

@MichaelHannigan I thought you Republicans celebrated when government comes to a standstill. 

td1234

td1234

5pts

@dreluv Georgia does not hold elections in a vacuum. The results in Georgia affect the rest of the country. Electing Perdue to the US Senate will check Obama and the Obama agenda. 

I do not have to leave the country. We just have to elect a Republican controlled Senate and Obama will be effectively neutered for the last two years of his Presidency and then we can get a real leader in the White House.  

CherokeeCounty

CherokeeCounty

5pts

@td1234 

The Obama agenda?

You mean robust energy production, a consumer protection bureau, 15 million Americans newly provided health insurance, millions saved in the student loan program because he took the big banksters out of the equation, saved (along with President Bush) the auto industry, got rid of “Don’t Ask Dont Tell”, credit card reforms which prohibit banks from charging you $35 when you overdraw your account for a 99 cent cup of coffee, expansion of stem cell research, and oh yeah, found Osama bin Laden a nice resting place as shark bait on the bottom of the ocean?

Those Obama agenda items?  Yeah by all means we wouldn’t want any more of those kind of things.

honested

honested

5pts

@td1234 

Well, for those of us who WHOLEHEARTEDLY SUPPORT the OBAMA AGENDA (whatever you guys think that is) THIS IS GREAT NEWS!

And of course, that makes a vote for shady and/or sonny’s cousin mean more crooked government, more jobs shipped offshore, more time in last place for unemployment, more time at the bottom of the education pyramid, more of the same, only worse!

MichaelHannigan

MichaelHannigan

5pts

@DS @MichaelHannigan 

DS: You’re the only one who responded.  The leftist/socialist/demokrat weenies (they know who they are) won’t respond as they can only crow about Lil Jason.  Yes, we need a Governor who has the gumption and fortitude to expand on ideas and move forward, but neither one of the ones running can do that.  I wish I could votefor another candidate but never a demokrat.

MichaelHannigan

MichaelHannigan

5pts

@Kamchak @MichaelHannigan 

Surprisingly, I am too.  I never said Deal WASN’T a crook and if he is proven in a court of law to be a crook and owes the money, the law should take over and get him.

MichaelHannigan

MichaelHannigan

5pts

@NWGAL @MichaelHannigan 

In as much as I wouldn’t have voted for Li’l Jason, it wouldn’t be my fault…My guess is that the demokrats knew what would happen and…and…you guessed it:  You (and they) wanted it (government) to “come to a standstill.”

I do hope, however, that this will not happen and that the GA Government will continue to roll on and let the state progress without having to put up with another Carter (UGH!)

dreluv

dreluv

5pts

It will never happen td1234 the democrat will continue control senate and president Obama will veto the republican agenda.

td1234 why where you blasting Bush lousy job he put this country into a deep mess.

Nathan Deal and David Perdue=Bush

Georgia republican put this state in the bottom of everything.

The whole country is laughing at Georgia because Nathan Deal have destroy this state and you republican are brainwash that Nathan Deal are you all hero.

Nathan Deal is the worst governor in the country.

honested

honested

5pts

@td1234 @dreluv 

tiny dog, 

The last thing the United States needs is total republiklan control of  both Houses of Congress.

If you cannot see the mess created by the anti-American Party in control of the United States House, then you certainly must not bee looking

MichaelHannigan

MichaelHannigan

5pts

@CherokeeCounty @td1234 

If Obozo is as truly geat as you try to say here, why does the American public still rate give him low marks and distrust his handling of the economy and a failure in foreign relations?  Look at the polls from your favorite drive-by media outlets and their biased  television outlets.  Can’t blame FOX News for this, sport.

MichaelHannigan

MichaelHannigan

5pts

@honested 

(dis)honested:  You are really out of your element in talking about “..more jobs shipped off shore,” etc.  You obviously don’t have a clue as to why the jobs went offshort in the first place.  Clue:  It’s not only a grabbing of profits to pay the world’s highers corporate taxes. Try: Unions, worker absenteeism, Worker’s Compensation fraud and a litany of other lesser-known maladies that plagued U.S, business for years and have to be solved before the businesses will come back to the U.S.

IReportYouWhine

IReportYouWhine

5pts

@Kamchak @IReportYouWhine What have you got against Americans, fascist?

CherokeeCounty

CherokeeCounty

5pts

@MichaelHannigan @CherokeeCounty @td1234 

You’re kidding right? There’s a multi billion dollar media industry out there dedicated to making tons of cash by bashing the Prez and stirring up folks like you, then selling them gold and viagra. And you wonder why some polls don’t look all that good?

Kamchak

Kamchak

5pts

@MichaelHannigan 

Look at the polls from your favorite drive-by media outlets and their biased  television outlets.

And exactly which polls are those, sport?

Kamchak

Kamchak

5pts

@IReportYouWhine

(shrug) 

You can either back up what comes out of that pie-hole of yours, or you can’t.

It’s not complicated.

MichaelHannigan

MichaelHannigan

5pts

@Kamchak @MichaelHannigan 

Yep, I do as I authored many reports about that in a previous life.  however, you would have to take my word on that..and I care not that you won’t believe me or what i said.

Aside from your not believing that Unions were a factor, you no doubt don’t know much, if anything, about business absenteeism and WC fraud.  It’s out there but, like gays, it remains in the closet as a fearful topic to drag (no pun intended) out in the open.

Did the mention of gays also upset you? Hmmm.

 

 

IReportYouWhine

IReportYouWhine

5pts

@Kamchak Yeah, that’s what I thought, there weren’t that many unregistered low info dummycrats left in the state.

So it has to be foreigners.

Kamchak

Kamchak

5pts

@IReportYouWhine 

Perhaps you should respond to what I actually post rather than respond the the $h*t you merely make up and wish I had posted.

Just suggestin’.


Article source: http://politics.blog.ajc.com/2014/09/24/why-self-driving-cars-could-soon-roam-fayettes-streets/

Tesla Plans Hong Kong Expansion to Tap Electric Car Demand

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